California legislator calls for return to bilingual educations

February 21, 2014

education-picCalifornia State Senator Ricardo Lara proposed a ballot measure Thursday that would reverse the state’s ban on multilingual education in public schools. [LA Times]

Sixteen years ago, California voters approved Proposition 227, which requires public schools to instruct students in English. Lara, a Bell Gardens Democrat, has proposed that parents receive a choice as whether to let their children participate in bilingual education.

“English will always remain the official language of California, but we cannot ignore the growing need to have a multilingual workforce,” Lara said. Employers seek multilingual employees and all students — English and non-English learners alike — deserve access to this invaluable skill.”

The percentage of elementary school-age students enrolled in multilingual programs declined from 39 percent in 1997 to 13 percent in 2001 after the law took effect, Lara said.

Lara has the backing of the California Association for Bilingual Education and Californians Together, an organization of parents, teachers, education advocates and civil rights groups.

 


30 Comments

  1. topper01 says:

    Since English is not our official language and neither is Spanish; let me suggest a third language so that everyone is equally disadvantaged. Make as much sense as teaching in two separate languages.

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  2. Gordo says:

    The one thing that brought together our multi ethnic, multi racial nation was a common language; it is just a peculiar twist of fate that the language is English.
    Immigrants and their children must learn it to be successful in this country.
    I do think that students should learn a second language; Mandarin Chinese, not Spanish will be the language that will increase our children’s employment in the 21st Century.

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  3. isoslo says:

    Pandering to the base

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 1

  4. willnose says:

    The most common language in the United States is known as American English. English is the de facto national language of the United States, with 80% of the population claiming it as a mother tongue, and some 95% claiming to speak it “well” or “very well”.[5] However, NO OFFICIAL LANGUAGE EXISTS AT THE FEDERAL LEVEL. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_the_United_States

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    • topper01 says:

      You need to look no further than our northerly neighbors to see what happens when there is no “Official Language” of a country.

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  5. Paso_citizen says:

    To spend our tax dollars in ‘requiring’ bilingual education is totally stupid. If a student wants to learn another language -OK, but don’t require it.

    English is the official language of the United States. If someone wants to move here, get
    employed here – then learn to speak English. Name me just one other country that you can move to and expect that county to allow you to speak your native language and to expect that country to pander to your native language to the degree Mexicans expect us to pander to theirs.

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    • willnose says:

      The most common language in the United States is known as American English. English is the de facto national language of the United States, with 80% of the population claiming it as a mother tongue, and some 95% claiming to speak it “well” or “very well”.[5] However, NO OFFICIAL LANGUAGE EXISTS AT THE FEDERAL LEVEL. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_the_United_States

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      • Mikayla says:

        Which language was the Declaration of Independence,and the US Constitution written in? I say we go with that one.

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    • miles archer says:

      “Name me just one other country that you can move to and expect that county to allow you to speak your native language…”

      Hmmmm, well…how about the U.S. of A.?

      Ever been to Chinatown? Or Little Saigon?

      I don’t see anyone up on arms about the fact that the Chinese and Vietnamese BOTH have communites in California where you won’t find a lick of English that’s written or spoken. They live, work and PAY TAXES just like anyone else.

      Where’s the outrage over that?

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      • topper01 says:

        ….and that is why they are “isolated” and not become assimilated into our culture. A country within our country.

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