SLO County to disburse $28 million in Diablo Canyon mandated funds

July 23, 2019

San Luis Obispo County received $28.35 million last  week in state-mandated funds slated to help ease the local public health, safety and economic impacts of the closure of Diablo Canyon Power Plant. [Cal Coast Times]

In 2025, Diablo Canyon Power Plant is scheduled to stop operations. About
$9.6 million of the funds received are to be used by the county and incorporated cities for economic development purposes. The remaining $18.75 million will be passed on to over 70 local public agencies, including the San Luis Coastal Unified School District and all incorporated cities, to support essential services that risk losing funding as Diablo Canyon nears closure.

“This is good news for our region as it will allow us to fund important programs and services that will help SLO County mitigate the impacts caused by the closure of Diablo Canyon Power Plant,” said Guy Savage, assistant county administrative officer. “We look forward to continuing to forge public-private partnerships that will help us maintain essential public services and education services, while also restructuring and building a stable local economy.”

SB 1090,  which was authored by Senator Monning, ensured that the community would receive $85 million in Community Impact Mitigation Funds, which are broken into two components: Economic Development Funds ($10 million) and the Essential Services Mitigation Funds ($75 million). Roughly half of the Essential Services Mitigation Funds will go to local schools to maintain critical programs.


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DocT

Spend it all now. Waste it if need be, just spend it.


Then start a 2 year media campaign against PGE and re-litigate and get 30 more million.


Your electric bill is going to offset a portion of the stimulated economy that the politicians will create.


Pay raises all around!


nunsense

Little kids, hands out – “gimme, gimme, gimme”


kayaknut

So as with the closing of Diablo which it is known will happen in a few years lets take this money and continue our wild spending and not reduce our costs to the expected level of income after Diablo closes. When it does and this new found money is gone lets again start scaring the voters with talk of vital service cuts until they vote us more taxes. i.e. kick kick kick the can down the road just as with the billions of unfunded pension debt.


shelworth

Don’t you mean 20 million? Nod-nod, wink-wink…


fat chance

I’m sure it will go in someone’s pocket. I’m sure not the taxpayers…..


SLOChildrenAtPlay

It will go straight to government employee pension deficits, and salary increases. The only way to keep the socialist politicians elected is keep hiring more union voters and pay them more than they would ever earn in the private sector.


ratherbefishing

Best we have honest auditors on the job prior to disbursement, a lot of that money may simply disappear into various pockets.


oldtimer

And we know it does here in slo. John Wallace etc. Even recently, a man whom represented a proposed quarry, lots of land and money for asphalt in Santa Margarita; then ran for Slo Mayor, then they just claim conflict of interest.

IE Grumpy man John Peschong, Paso Council, etc. and lost.


womanwhohasbeenthere

Be assured it will disappear and not one citizen will benefit from it. It won’t show up in the schools at the classroom level nor in better services for residents. It will go to salaries and benefits, backfill other services so it can be spent elsewhere, and/or frittered away on fixing things at city hall. What a waste. But we ratepayers will cover it!


Gordo

When the money runs out and nothing has sprung up to match the economic contributions of Diablo, what then? Back to being a broke dick cow county like we were in the 1970s?


Myself

That would be called living within their means.


Gordo

We did live within our means and for those of us who lived here back then it won’t be a shock, but for everybody who has moved here since 1980 it is going to be a rude awakening when the things they have taken for granted start to disappear.