Raw milk sickens 5 California children

November 21, 2011

Raw milk products made in Fresno County are blamed for making five children sick with E. coli between August and October. [FresnoBee]

The California Department of Food and Agriculture has initiated a state-wide recall and quarantine of raw milk products from Organic Pastures Dairy. State officials have order the dairy’s products to be pulled from store shelves and are asking consumers to discard the products.

Owner Mark McAfee was also the subject of a recall in 2006 after four children became sick with E. coli bacteria, the Fresno Bee said.

“State health investigators found that the children, who live in Kings, Contra Costa, Sacramento and San Diego counties, had consumed one common food: raw milk from Organic Pastures Dairy,” the Bee said.

However, health inspectors found no traces of E. coli contamination at the dairy.



  1. mkaney says:

    Having been reminded by this article how good raw milk is, I went over to Sally Lu’s (cafe near the RR station) to pick some up, only to be informed that they are not allowed to sell any right now. Meanwhile, the grocery store is filled with chemical laden foods that cause chronic illnesses, hyperactivity, and ADD in children, and the local pharmacies are filled with potentially deadly drugs. The FDA is one of the most useless federal agencies in existence. Another reason to elect Ron Paul president.

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  2. LittleAcorn says:

    The big problem that I see here is that none of the milk samples, even the samples collected from the homes where the children became ill, have tested positive for e.coli.

    So the state quarantines all the products from a dairy that produces 2,400 gallons a day with no proof that the dairy is responsible.

    If the parents buy unpasteurized milk, what other products do they buy that might contain e.coli?

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    • mkaney says:

      You are presuming that the FDA is actually interested in what caused the illness, rather than being driven by an agenda.

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      • LittleAcorn says:

        Good point. I think that rOy’s post addresses the agenda issue. According to the link he provided, an FDA spokesperson stated that the FDA didn’t approve of raw milk being sold.

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  3. r0y says:

    You know, I never heard anything about raw milk until I heard about that Fed raid on the Amish farmer – no that’s not Big-Brotherish at all! Javol!

    Now, it’s becoming “a concern” with government types. Excuse me? What the hell did we do as a planet before Louis Pasteur? Something doesn’t smell right. And I doubt it’s the milk.

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    • Cindy says:

      I think people probably got sick a lot before Louis Pasteur.

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      • mkaney says:

        They did if the cows were kept in poor conditions. Louis Pasteur didn’t make drinking milk safe, he made industrial farming “safe.”

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        • racket says:

          Great point about Pasteur.

          It mimics the “irradiated meats” controversy.

          Irradiation doesn’t make meat safe to eat, it makes the shit on the meat safe to eat. Which thereby allows for more mechanized beef harvesting and butchering (because mechanized butchering has a hard time keeping the shit out of the meat).

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          • mkaney says:

            *Shudder* Why is the truth always so darned unpleasant? lol

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            • racket says:

              Is that some kind of dairy secret???


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  4. mkaney says:

    I had the good fortune to try raw milk recently which I purchased at the farmer’s market in Santa Monica. All I can say is that if you have not ever tried it, you are missing out. It is the most delicious milk I have ever tasted in my life, and I will be purchasing more in the future.

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  5. Cindy says:

    If there were no traces of e-coli at the dairy, then I wonder how it got into the milk? Obviously the common denominator here was the raw milk ?

    I have a question about raw food and wonder if anyone knowledgeable can contribute to my way of thinking about raw eggs? I have reason to use egg’s (slightly cooked) in certain foods like ice cream. The eggs are not fully cooked but only slightly tempered into the home made mix. I’m familiar with the concerns of salmonella so I only use CalPoly eggs. I hear they (CP) are very particular with their chickens, they do testing and the chickens are properly raised and cared for. My question is am I fooling myself ?? I use lot’s of eggs in the ice cream because I have a friend that can not consume dairy products and the egg yolks are what add the fat and creamy texture to the finished product.

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    • Vagabond says:

      This website has some good info on raw eggs: http://www.answerfitness.com/250/are-raw-eggs-safe-to-eat-fitness-nerd/
      Short answer is wash the eggs before cracking, don’t use eggs that are already cracked.
      It’s also interesting that I do believe in Europe they vaccinate the chickens for salmonella, thereby eliminating the problem before it starts. I may be misinformed here so caveat emptor

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      • Cindy says:

        Thanks, That was an interesting read. From now on I’ll simply wash my eggs before I crack them. I’ve always known not to consume an egg that had a crack but I always thought it was because of every other possible reason I could think of! Washing the shells before I crack them combined with using CalPoly eggs should probably do the trick where concerns of Salmonella are concerned. Again Thanks

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        • Vagabond says:

          I no longer live down there, but I think if I did I’d seek out a small egg producer, up here in Oregon I buy from a small farm just a few miles away, the chickens are pastured, in that they are allowed to eat bugs and stuff. A dozen eggs is three bucks and you always get a nice variety of sizes and colors. The taste is incomparable with the yolks a bright orange.

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  6. racket says:

    This is a win for industrial farming.

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