Cross burning defendants offered plea agreements

March 26, 2012

Jason Kahn

The San Luis Obispo County District Attorney’s office offered plea agreements to the four defendants accused of committing a hate crime against a black teen in Arroyo Grande last year. [Tribune]

On March 18, 2011, Jason Kahn, 36, Jeremiah Hernandez, 32, William Soto, 20, and Sara Matheny, 24, allegedly set ablaze an 11-foot cross in direct view of a 19-year-old woman’s bedroom in the home she resided in with her mixed race family.

In July, the four suspects entered not guilty pleas  and formally faced felony charges of arson, cross burning, terrorism, and conspiracy. The charges include hate crime enhancements.

Kahn was also charged with witness intimidation.

Specific details of the plea agreements offered to the defendants have not been disclosed.

The defendants are scheduled to be back in San Luis Obispo Superior Court to discuss the plea negotiations on Wednesday at 3 p.m.


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6 Comments

  1. south says:

    Message to self: edit before posting.

    (8) 8 Total Votes - 8 up - 0 down
  2. south says:

    Look – these people could just be knuckleheads and probably are; all destined to a life of nothing. Adding nothing to society, just taking. But I want to make a comment that I hope will be jumped on by posters, pro or con.

    There used to be a time when one would look at a mug shot of Kahn, this one, and immediately associate him as a neo Nazi or AB. He has the look. Shaved head, necklace tattoos, plus the alleged crime. Yep he is a hater and probably is.

    That being said, how many of our media stars look close to this guy,and how many teens and young adults, in an effort to emulate the thug culture – all colors and cultures – have bracketed themselves and forfeited their potential?

    That’s actually a question that is preceded by another. While looking antisocial or counter-coultre has always been intriguing. When did it become the norm? Is there are norm, and if so, what extremes does one have to go to?

    (7) 11 Total Votes - 9 up - 2 down
    • MaryMalone says:

      QUOTING SOUTH: “That’s actually a question that is preceded by another. While looking antisocial or counter-coultre has always been intriguing. When did it become the norm? Is there are norm, and if so, what extremes does one have to go to?

      I think wearing underdrawers on your head would, in most cultures, mark you as “not normal.”

      (2) 2 Total Votes - 2 up - 0 down
      • south says:

        Define underdrawers. I witnessed an internationally broadcast wedding recently where one lady wore a headdress that could only be described as something that should be covered by underdrawers.

        (1) 5 Total Votes - 3 up - 2 down
        • MaryMalone says:

          Not a pretty mental image.

          I define “underdrawers” as clothing one wears next to one’s body that are not usually seen by the public.

          (3) 5 Total Votes - 4 up - 1 down
      • eradicate ignorance says:

        Depends on the source of the underdrawers.

        (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down

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