Pismo Beach council tables building moratorium

May 20, 2015

Barrel to Barrel in Pismo BeachFollowing objections from residents and developers, the Pismo Beach City Council tabled a proposed building moratorium. [Tribune]

On Tuesday, the council considered adopting an ordinance that would prohibit the city from issuing building permits for vacant lots. Developers could only continue to build on vacant lots if they completed permit applications prior to the moratorium taking effect.

When phased in, the proposed ordinance would also ban redevelopment of existing buildings unless the renovation includes at least a 30 percent reductions in water use. Likewise, it would ban all municipal irrigation, unless the city council directs otherwise.

Developer Gary Grossman called the proposed restrictions draconian. Grossman has built multiple housing developments in Pismo Beach.

Gary Grossman

Gary Grossman

Councilman Erik Howell said the moratorium would shut down the main economic engine of Pismo Beach. Howell said several large projects, including hotels are already in the pipeline.

Council members said they would prefer to have more information before potentially stalling those projects.

However, the council did request that staff bring back the moratorium proposal in the fall. In the meantime, the council plans to assess how new water restrictions are working.

During Tuesday’s meeting, the council declared that Pismo Beach is in a critical water supply shortage. The declaration allows the city to impose any water-rationing measures it deems necessary to preserve public health.

Water conservation measures under consideration include requiring commercial businesses to install no-water urinals and creating more rebate programs for city residents. The city currently prohibits residents from washing cars and sidewalks with a hose.

Outdoor irrigation is also limited to the hours between 4 p.m. and 10 a.m.

Some residents and developers asked the city to look into acquiring water from the desalination plant at Diablo Canyon. Earlier Tuesday, the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors and PG&E agreed to examine ways to make the desalinated water available to nearby communities.


Loading...

10 Comments

  1. achillesheal says:

    What’s shocking to me is that there are any vacant lots in Pismo.

    (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down
  2. suzyque says:

    The water problem means the City must pay attention to the existing businesses, and postpone any new businesses until it’s resolved. The City should also be wary of any and all Developers and first address all of the residents concerns.

    (5) 5 Total Votes - 5 up - 0 down
  3. sbjcl says:

    This council has been bought and paid for by Grossman. To add new hookups in the worst drought in history is a recipe for disaster. What kind of leadership is this?

    (13) 23 Total Votes - 18 up - 5 down
  4. Mitch C says:

    Silliest thinking (or non thinking) that I can imagine: restrict the use of water for those living here but invite more water users to join the population. I guess that the city fathers believe that having the diminished water supply available to more people is good business. If water is a sparse commodity having more people sharing it isn’t logical. This is real fuzzy thinking.

    (17) 21 Total Votes - 19 up - 2 down
  5. aft50s says:

    Wrong again (as usual) Ted.

    Many more streets than in the 1950’s

    Perhaps you should spend some more time in the “New” Testament.

    (7) 13 Total Votes - 10 up - 3 down
    • kayaknut says:

      He prefers the “Ted” Testament.

      (2) 14 Total Votes - 8 up - 6 down
      • Ted Slanders says:

        Kayaknut,

        Surely you jest! All of the verses that I include in my godly posts are directly from the Old and New Testaments of the Hebrew Christian’s God’s bible.

        (-5) 7 Total Votes - 1 up - 6 down
    • mbbizpro says:

      Just think of the impact on the horses on the trails there.

      (-4) 4 Total Votes - 0 up - 4 down
    • Ted Slanders says:

      Aft50s,

      I am sorry, I should have defined it better for some people, the scenario is meant to relate to “downtown.” You know, where all those “other added” streets end up more so than not.

      (-1) 3 Total Votes - 1 up - 2 down
  6. Ted Slanders says:

    The same amount of streets as back in the 1950’s, but quadruple the population as it stands today? Sure, this makes sense to the greedy city and developers, why not?

    A novel idea would be to make a huge parking structure next, emptying upon a one way street before any more clogging of Pismo Beach is even considered!

    “Whoever is greedy for unjust gain troubles his own household, but he who hates bribes will live.” (Proverbs 15:27)

    (-15) 21 Total Votes - 3 up - 18 down

Comments are closed.