SLO County hit with a surge in new coronavirus cases, 14 in one day

April 24, 2020

San Luis Obispo County saw its biggest jump on Friday of confirmed coronavirus cases, following an increase in testing from private labs.

After averaging about two new cases a day, on Wednesday the county had eight confirmed cases, seven on Thursday and 14 on Friday. Currently, there are only three coronavirus patients in the hospital, a large decline from April 1 when 10 people were hospitalized.

At the same time, private labs have increased testing, and lowered illness requirements.

Of the 163 confirmed cases of coronavirus in San Luis Obispo County, 119 individuals have recovered and one has died. Of those still suffering from the virus, there are three people in the hospital — with one in intensive care, and 40 recuperating at home.

Cases by city:

  • Paso Robles — 47
  • Atascadero 28
  • Arroyo Grande — 19
  • Nipomo — 15
  • San Luis Obispo — 14
  • Templeton — 8
  • San Miguel — 7
  • Pismo Beach — 7
  • Morro Bay — 6
  • Other county cases — 12

In California, there have been 40,812 positive cases and 1,594 deaths.

Currently, more than 912,838 U.S. residents have tested positive for the virus, and 51,607 have died.

In addition, the number of people infected with the virus worldwide continues to increase: 2,813,538 cases with 196,412 dead.

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Grover

…however they’re testing more people and none of the new cases warented hospitalization.


RalphKane

Hmmm….just about the right incubation period after Easter gatherings, and again Paso leads the way.


Similar demographics and behaviours to northern Santa Barbara County.


MrYan

Hmmm is right. Again Ralph SAY what you imply; Mexicans? They are good Catholics.


Is that what you keep returning to? North of 24th…. on a previous post.


Or maybe you are referring to Conservatives who live in the two north counties? They don’t seem to think Covid 19 is a big deal, perhaps they are the ones not adhering to the rules.


Please clarify, as you keep beating this drum. I would welcome to hear it is not their race that you are so concerned about …post after post after post.


Jorge Estrada

I have a problem with using partial data for public manipulation. Yes this virus is bad and many have died but the testing has been very limited and the only data that holds true would be the deaths that were directly accompanied by the COVID virus. This would be the general public and certainly if there are other health factors the same would be true for Valley Fever as well as other inflictions. COVID-19 although very bad, it seems to be a cleansing on mankind because it seems to reek havoc on certain people. The report says that some people are marginally affect and don’t seek recorded medical help. I question that this virus remains in one form as it seems to be more intense with crowds. Then again, that too is a per capita margin. All said, I still take the precautions.


Slosum

Not “new” cases. Just cases verified that already existed. Refer to Stanford and UCLA studies. We had this thing well before we knew it. Time to get back to work.


shelworth

The more people they test, the more they will find with the virus, or at least the antibodies to it (meaning they had it, but didn’t even know it). As the number of reported cases goes up the mortality rate for Covid-19 goes down, this is a good thing. As soon as 60+% have had it, herd immunity kicks in: Herd immunity is a form of indirect protection from infectious disease that occurs when a large percentage of a population has become immune to an infection, whether through previous infections or vaccination, thereby providing a measure of protection for individuals who are not immune.


RalphKane

You can throw herd immunity out the window if this thing mutates, which means previous victims could get it in a different flavor. It also makes vaccinations like chasing a fleeting target.


We shall see this fall when it boomerangs on us after percolating in the southern hemisphere.