Thirteen arrested for drug trafficking

May 4, 2011

Thirteen men from Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties were arrested on narcotics and gang related charges, the result of a year-long investigation involving local, state and federal law-enforcement agencies.

The men are suspected members of a Lompoc-based subset of the Six Deuce Brims Bloods and the Northwest (Santa Maria) street gang.

Two San Luis Obispo County men, Freddie Sutton, 51, of Oceano and Christopher DeLong, 50, of Arroyo Grande, were charged with conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and distribution of methamphetamine. Nine of the gang members are from Santa Maria.

“With this morning’s arrests, we have collectively delivered a powerful message to the criminal street gangs and drug dealers who think they can operate in this region,” said United States Attorney André Birotte Jr. “We will use every tool at our disposal to disrupt this criminal activity so that we can ensure the safety of the people who live and work in our neighborhoods.”


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15 Comments

  1. easymoney says:

    Good, arrest them all and put them away for a long time. How many have noticed the increase in tweeker crimes in the last five years? How far down the crapper do we go before we say enough is enough?

    (2) 6 Total Votes - 4 up - 2 down
    • mkaney says:

      No, I haven’t actually noticed the increase in tweeker crimes in the last five years. Would you care to share with us some factual, valid information? Yeah, I kinda didn’t think that you actually had any. Did you get the same gut feeling that Iraq had WMDs?

      (1) 7 Total Votes - 4 up - 3 down
      • r0y says:

        easymoney could be refering to this or this (under “The Data”) – but I won’t put words in his/her mouth…

        (-1) 3 Total Votes - 1 up - 2 down
        • mkaney says:

          An increase in the amount of drugs seized is a very different thing than an increase in the amount of crimes related to that drug… let me clarify that I am defining crime here under “natural law”… that is, something that infringes upon the civil rights, property rights, or freedoms of another person, not drug violations.

          (3) 3 Total Votes - 3 up - 0 down
      • Brando940 says:

        u have no clue mkaney all the kids on it these days no joke

        (-2) 2 Total Votes - 0 up - 2 down
  2. LittleAcorn says:

    I have no sympathy for anyone involved with meth. It would be good to see the DA lean hard on white collar crime though. I’m sick of white collar criminals saying that they are non-violent criminals and should therefore receive lighter sentences. Tell that to the people they destroyed financially.

    (4) 6 Total Votes - 5 up - 1 down
    • mkaney says:

      You actually just said a lot more than you probably even realized. First, something in your brain is bothering you about these white collar criminals getting off so easily. I would suggest it is because you subconsciously realize what is a crime and what isn’t. A crime is (ought to be) when you do something to adversely effect another person’s rights or property. That is what our law enforcement ought to be worried about.

      But it’s not, because they have found that they can make WAY more money hyping up drug crimes and building a giant prison industry. So, knowing that very few people have sympathy for drug addicts, that is one of the groups they target. Certainly, people should be punished for any crime they commit aganst another person, and drugs should never be considered an excuse. But wouldn’t you rather see their efforts against these kind of criminals beefed up in preference to drug-only crimes?

      (3) 3 Total Votes - 3 up - 0 down
      • r0y says:

        …that and it’s easier to propagandize fear based on phsyically-violent crimes than it is on non-physically-violent (white-collar) crime. And Baby: FEAR SELLS! Ask any news outlet or politician!

        (-1) 3 Total Votes - 1 up - 2 down
  3. hotdog says:

    said United States Attorney André Birotte Jr. “We will use every tool at our disposal to disrupt this criminal activity so that we can ensure the safety of the people who live and work in our neighborhoods.”

    What a joke. The white-collar criminals make off with $500 million and only two are in jail for light sentences, the others not even charged after years of living large off us. The truth of all this has resonated for centuries-the powerful get off, the street two-bit thief gets life. Shame on our limp wristed politicians and LE for being such dicks about these larger crimes of mass fraud and theft, while swaggering around beating their chests about rounding up a few malcontents.

    And if we ever get our heads out of our butts we will legalize all drugs but penalize abuse, just like we do with alcohol. The drug war is such a dysfunctional piece of crap, making fortunes for some but doing us no good at all. And it has been a loser since it started. If ever legalized we can begin to look rationally at drug use (duh, why not?).

    (6) 12 Total Votes - 9 up - 3 down
    • r0y says:

      Every “social” war is a disastrous failure. War on Poverty: we have more poor, and a larger income disparity than ever before. War on Drugs: more drugs, addictions & violence than ever before. Education Reform (at least they realized “War on Education” would have been horribly named, no matter how accurate it sounds): flat-line results (even after dumbing down tests and cheating on results).

      I cannot think of one “War on…” that has worked. Personal responsibility = less government intrusion (and the indoctrination that goes along with it), so it will likely never be called for by the parties in power.

      I know what I’d do if I found my kids even going near some of those substances… I don’t need the government backing me up; I’ve got it handled.

      (1) 5 Total Votes - 3 up - 2 down
  4. rogerfreberg says:

    okay, okay… good job as far as it goes.

    How about a drug sniffing dog at SLO High?

    (-4) 8 Total Votes - 2 up - 6 down
  5. r0y says:

    How dare anyone create a non-taxable economy! How dare someone create pharmaceuticals without paying their dues (to politicians). This simple cannot happen! Think of public safety (not all that missed revenue and political payoffs). Yes. Public Safety. Who can be against that?

    Why drugs destroy lives! Guns kill people! Laws protect us! People have nothing to do with any of this!

    (5) 15 Total Votes - 10 up - 5 down
    • r0y says:

      Sorry, I’m a bit snarky this morning. I do like when genuine dirt bags are taken off the streets, but my faith in government is basically at an all-time low.

      (10) 14 Total Votes - 12 up - 2 down
      • Jack L says:

        These kind of bangers are lethal. Best to get them out of society while you can.

        (1) 7 Total Votes - 4 up - 3 down
        • mkaney says:

          Really? Are they? Care to share some statistics or are you just basing this off the evening news?

          (2) 2 Total Votes - 2 up - 0 down

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