Study shows HPV vaccine not linked to promiscuity in girls

October 15, 2012

A study released in today’s Pediatrics journal found that preteen girls who received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine have not become any more promiscuous than unvaccinated girls. [USA Today]

Lead author of the study Robert A, Bednarczyk used three years of Kaiser Permanente data on 1,398 girls, vaccinated at ages 11 and 12, to determine that vaccinated girls were no more likely that unvaccinated girls to get pregnant, develop sexually transmitted infections or seek birth-control counseling. Researchers in the study, however, did not ask the girls whether or not they were having sex.

Less than one percent of the girls tested — both those vaccinated for HPV and those in the control group — tested positive for a sexually transmitted infection. Likewise, less than one percent had positive pregnancy tests. Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated girls tested at very similar rates.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that girls ages 11 to 12 receive three doses of the vaccine to protect them from HPV, but many parents object, some citing the potential for promiscuity as a reason.

But, parental control will no longer prevent California girls from receiving the HPV vaccine. Assembly Bill 499, signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown in Oct. 2011, allows girls 12-years-old and up to get the HPV shot without parental consent.

CDC figures show that 53 percent of girls ages 13 to 17 received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine in 2011.  The CDC also recommends the vaccine for males ages 11 to 21.

Yet, finding from a Freedom of Information Act request by Judicial Watch revealed that vaccine recipients reported thousands of adverse reactions to the HPV vaccine over a one year period to the national Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System VAERS), including cases of seizures and paralysis.

The CDC cosponsors VAERS, along with the Food and Drug Administration, which tested and licensed the two HPV vaccines on the market: Gardasil and Cervarix. Despite the the many reports of adverse reactions, both agencies say the vaccines are safe.



  1. pasoparent5 says:

    Something’s wrong with a state that allows 12 year old girls to get vacinnated without their folks’ permission AND also receive family planning assistance (including abortions) without their parents’ consent or even knowledge.

    Without a doctor’s written permission, my teen daughter cannot have a cough drop, Advil or aspirin in her backpack without breaking her school’s “zero tolerance” anti-drug policy. But, if she got pregnant and wanted a ride to Planned Parenthood, her school counselors/administrators have every legal right to take her there. Makes no sense…

    (2) 4 Total Votes - 3 up - 1 down
  2. CommonSenseMama says:

    Our kids have been poked and prodded with vaccines from the time they were born. It is no surprise that after having been given another vaccine at 11-12 years old the vaccine does not change their behavior.

    This was much more of an issue for the parents mandated than for the children themselves. It is the responsibility of the parents to ensure their children’s safety, personal rights, and well being are a priority. Leaving that up to the children is a detriment to everyone.

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    • pasoparent5 says:

      Well said, Mama. Also, note the last paragraph: “Despite the the many reports of adverse reactions, both agencies say the vaccines are safe…”
      That’s why we opted out…not for a fear of promiscuity but because the HPV vaccine is still relatively new and there HAVE been many cases of bad reactions among girls.

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    • SLOTECH90 says:

      It’s a bloody good thing that our kids have been poked and prodded with vaccines. Have you noticed that the life expectancy is now approaching 80, and that it is no longer necessary for families to spawn so
      many children because they know that half of them or more will die before age 15 of some disease that is now preventable This isn’t a question of behavior, it’s a question of health, wellness and longevity.

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      • CommonSenseMama says:

        I agree that immunizations have been beneficial- polio is one for sure. However, I also think that too many parents do not weigh the side effects of the vaccine vs. the risk of going without. (most of us survived the chicken pox)

        We aren’t allowed to question. We are just supposed to stand in line and shut-up. Otherwise, you are a bad parent.

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  3. SLOTECH90 says:

    Our resident Christian Ayatollah, Ted, is gonna hate this article. Let’s have three good Old Testament huzzahs for the science folks!!!

    (3) 7 Total Votes - 5 up - 2 down
  4. JRomulus says:

    A specious study to combat a weak argument against vaccination to begin with.

    Despite the pharmaceutical industry’s best efforts of foisting more products on the populace, many of which are of dubious value, and certainly don’t warrant “epidemic” type hysteria, the risk vs. reward ratio just isn’t there for this product for normal risk girls or boys.

    For those who fall into high risk demographic categories, they may want to take the vaccine.
    For the majority of Americans, (many of whom pass on the flu vaccine, which is less risky), the cost/benefit analysis says:

    Not necessary.

    (6) 8 Total Votes - 7 up - 1 down

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