California community colleges facing accreditation problems

July 22, 2013

cueata collegeAn increasing number of California community colleges are struggling to maintain their accreditation. [LA Times]

This month, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges announced its plan to revoke the accreditation of the City College of San Francisco in 2014 and placed eight other campuses on warning status.

Cuesta College is one of thirteen California community colleges currently on warning status, which is the least severe of three warning levels prior to revocation of accreditation. If a campus loses accreditation, its students lose their transfer credits.

Prior to placing Cuesta on warning status in February, the commission placed Cuesta in the “show cause” category, which is the most severe level of warning.

Currently, only one community college in the state is on show cause status — College of the Sequoias in Visalia. Five other colleges are on probationary status, the second most severe warning level.

Despite the passage of Proposition 30 in 2012, many educators are pointing to budget cutbacks as reason for the growing accreditation problem.

California has 112 community colleges with a total of 2.4 million students. The state’s community college system is the largest in the nation.

The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges is based in Novato and is one of seven private panels sanctioned by the federal government to award or terminate accreditation.




  1. r0y says:

    Good thing the K-12 system isn’t accredited. We’d be in REAL trouble, then.

    (3) 3 Total Votes - 3 up - 0 down
  2. jimmy_me says:

    Where did all the Prop 30 money go? Wasn’t that money supposed to solve all problems? The problem is that this money was given to administrators to do with as they wish. We’re seeing the results of where the money went right now. The approach taken by administrators is to moan about not having enough money so that the taxpayer will give them more; there is no incentive to actually fix problems.

    (2) 4 Total Votes - 3 up - 1 down
  3. Maxfusion says:

    “Despite the passage of Proposition 30 in 2012, many educators are pointing to budget cutbacks as reason for the growing accreditation problem.”

    Rubbish, it’s because the public school system is churning out students with marginal skills. In 1961 my high school graduated students on an academic track with two semesters of latin, two semesters of a foreign language, calculus, and an ability to differentiate between a subject and a predicate. That’s when California was consistently number one academically, with deference to Iowa, nationwide. Forty four years of liberal social nonsense has taken its toll. But hey look on the bright side, students today can put a condom
    on a cucumber faster than David Duke on a ten speed in East Palo Alto.

    (17) 21 Total Votes - 19 up - 2 down
    • Structure says:

      That was back in the pre-Prop 13 high tax days. Low prison population. Lower diversity. We had it freaken made buddy! Now lets cut back and not pay it down the road! Gonna buy a new F-150!

      (0) 8 Total Votes - 4 up - 4 down
  4. celebratepaso says:

    FYI ~ College of the Canyons is not in Visalia. The community college located there is College of the Sequoias. College of the Canyons is located in Valencia.

    (4) 6 Total Votes - 5 up - 1 down

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