CalPERS will reveal pensioners’ pay

July 9, 2013

calPERSIn a few more days, California’s gargantuan public retirement system will be an open book — or database — when CalPERS unveils information on individual retirees’ pensions and benefits. (Sacramento Bee)

Elements considered public information includes pensioners’ names; their monthly gross pension payment; base allowance; Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA); final compensation, last employer; and pension benefit formula.

Members of CalPERS were notified of the new policy earlier this month.

Officials of the retirement system said they know some retirees will not like the website transparency.

“We understand the sensitivity surrounding this database and know many of our members may object to what seems like traditionally very private information posted online,” CalPERS officials said in a letter. “We believe our member data will remain better protected on our own website rather than on external databases kept by news or other organizations.”


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Pelican1

Jealousy is an UGLY emotion!


Jorge Estrada

I can say that I know Pancho Via, why, we had lunch together. This emotion is not jealousy.


Pelican1

“Emotion? We ain’t got no emotion! We don’t need no emotion I don’t have to show you any stinking emotion!


jarhead

ALL YOU WHINERS out there crying about how much we state employees get now that we did 20 plus give it up , you had the same chance that we did for the jobs , YOU JUST WERE NOT QUALIFIED .

so why bust our Ba—s about what we get ? I left the private sector business, was making tons of money there , but did see the light at the END OF THE TUNNEL..

So just quit crying about how good we have it , GO GET A STATE OR FED OUR COUNTY JOB …………..


kayaknut

“SLO police officer pleads guilty to extortion” now that’s qualified personal, at least for you it is.


Truth Hurts

You people think the employee costs are bad in the government? At least these people are doing something……they should post the names of everyone on public assistance, the money they get for food and housing and how many kids they have….what is breaking this state and the country is the people getting stuff for free and exploiting the welfare laws…that is the real crime


zaphod

start with the many splendors of welfare for the wealthy then and slowly and methodically work your way down


OnTheOtherHand

I think you might be surprised at how small the public welfare portion of the budget is — unless you include Social Security, Medicare and Education as public Welfare.


When you are done researching that, check out how much welfare corporations get — from big Agriculture (ADM, Monsanto) to big Oil, from war profiteers (Cheney, Rumsfeld, Feinstein’s hubby) to big Pharmaceuticals, and of course there is the “Wall Street” crowd with TARP and other bailouts for their irresponsible money games. Hint, some of the welfare is in the form of tax breaks, some is in cushy, no-bid contracts, some is in protective regulations as well as direct subsidies and probably other stuff as well.


Yes there is waste and bad policy with general welfare and it should be corrected but, as Zaphod says, lets get the priorities right.


Truth Hurts

Tons of able bodied people are on welfare or get some sort of govt benefit EBT cards are passed out like candy on Halloween. I have seen a ton of people that are here illegally that get these cards….free child care, schools open in the summer just to provide free lunches to kids.alcoholics get SSI for being drunks…section 8 housing..the list goes on and on…..I agree there are a lot of loopholes to tax laws for the wealthy…but even with the loopholes they pay a large portion of the taxes in this country. The poor pay nothing and get the most assistance. 10% or a million a year is still more than 20% of 75k….I say flat tax and no write off. We should not subsidize kids or people’s mortgages!!!


Bert

I see some of you have bitten the hook attached to the Dem’s and Repub’s rods (no pun intended) that has been baited with the shiny distraction of those on welfare, and other public assistance. That cost is menial compared to well, say, the two “wars” we are “fighting” to keep us safe from “terrorists”. How much does Iraq and Afghanistan cost us per HOUR? Roughly twenty million dollars per hour ($20,000,000). http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/12/26/AR2007122601542_pf.html


How much has it cost us up to this precise moment? Click here… http://costofwar.com/


Have a nice day. :)


aft50s

I don’t know about anyone else on PERS, but I worked for a County here in California for 21 years, left public service and went to work in the private sector – the starting pay with my new employer was 240% of what I was making at the County when I left.


If the private sector is the measure used for determining if government employees are overpaid, well, you do the math… as for the pittance I get from PERS now that I’m over 60, it will never equal the delta between what I could have been making for just the last 10 years of County employment (unless I live to longer than 113 years old).


I have no doubt there are cases of ridiculous PERS pensions, but don’t group every public servant in with those folks (and by the way, I paid the employees share of PERS).


Jorge Estrada

Some people in the private sector are paid very well because their company is being over paid through a priviledged sweetheart contract funded by the taxpayers. Just one example, you don’t have to be a government employee to get some of the royal jam.


kayaknut

California Common Sense, a nonprofit and nonpartisan watchdog group, recently released a study pointing out that California’s major retirement systems now have $222.2 billion in unfunded pensions, up from $211.4 billion five months ago. The report says that number was $110 billion in 2007-2008, meaning the state’s unfunded pensions have doubled in six years.


It would seem that the “employee share” you have paid is not enough


OnTheOtherHand

The problem also has to do with the fact that some (most?) public pensions have a payout rate guaranteed by the taxpayer that is unrealistic. If you invested in a private sector 401-K or your own IRA with, say, Lehman Bros you had to take huge lumps when the crash came. Public employees don’t have that downside risk but get a similar upside return. That is fine when the market is doing great but leaves the taxpayers footing the bill when investments don’t do as well.


It is not that you don’t deserve a pension for the contributions you made to PERS. It is that you shouldn’t expect to have the returns guaranteed by tax payers when they aren’t at the high levels to which you became accustomed 10 years ago.


MaryMalone

What happened to privacy rights of employees?


LAH

Privacy rights? Government employees don’t have rights to privacy under Obama. Even the school kids no longer have privacy rights. Privacy is a thing of the past.


kayaknut

What happened to the rights of those paying, the taxpayers, to know where exactly their money is going? When paying your bills don’t you want to know where your money is going?


zaphod

what do you mean “their money” ? when taxes are paid it isn’t your money anymore. any proprietary attachments you may entertain are imaginary.


kayaknut

It’s not the actual dollar bill, or in the case of taxes, thousand dollar bills, that I want to keep attachment too, it’s just the knowledge of where it’s going and to whom, just as when I pay my bills, I know it’s not my money anymore but I certainly know where and to whom it went


Paso_citizen

So when this information becomes public, what can we do; except get sick to our stomachs, barf in our morning coffee, and go off to our menial jobs with even more realization that those that chose to make their living at the public trough have it made, in Spades.


Should make it ever so more pleasant that the money you (or your parents) spent on a college education for a technical or professional career (medical, law, etc.) was all worth it – ha! ha!


The best career path to follow is to get a position in city, county, or state government – follow the rules,

keep your nose clean, and work your way up to a position that allows you to retire in your mid-50’s at

something around 85% to 90% of your salary for the rest of your life. How can anybody argue against that?


Is this a great state or what?


SLOTECH90

I have worked at ASH for 23 years and I know of NOBODY who has retired at 85-90% o their

salary. Quit spreading DISINFORMATION.


Zuma7

Back in the mid-60’s the best advice my father-in-law gave my husband was, “get a job with the city”. (L.A. City) It turned out to be good advice. My hubby put in well over 25 years and worked his buns off. Now, sweet retirement plan and paid medical for life. Hey, they were begging for people to come work for the city back then. We all have choices in life…….


SLOTECH90

I am really tired of reading/hearing all the sniveling that goes on every time mention is made of

what retired State, etc employees are paid. I would love to see all the bellyachers get jobs at ASH or CMC. My bet is they couldn’t or wouldn’t hack it!


womanwhohasbeenthere

Finally a list of the REAL one-percenters in this state! Just remember these are our tax dollars that are providing these fantastic retirements – so when service are cut you will know who to thank.


honest abe

prepare to get sick when seeing how much money these tens of thousands of people get paid for the rest of their lives and comparing it to the amount of money your employer is going to give to you……