Former California legislator to be sentenced for voter fraud

October 14, 2014
Richard Alarcon

Richard Alarcon

A former California legislator is scheduled to be sentenced Tuesday, along with his wife, for convictions stemming from his serving on the Los Angeles City Council while living outside the district he represented. [MyNewsLA]

In July, a jury convicted Democratic politician Richard Alarcon, 60, of three counts of fraudulent voting and one count of perjury by declaration. Alarcon’s wife, Flora, 49, received convictions of two counts of fraudulent voting and one count of perjury by declaration.

During the trial, prosecutors alleged that Alarcon and his wife lied about living at a home in Panorama City, which was in Alarcon’s district. The jury acquitted Alarcon of about 12 other felony counts and his wife of two other accounts.

The perjury convictions pertained to Alarcon lying on his statement of intent to become a council candidate and his wife’s declaration involving a provisional ballot.

Alarcon served initially on the Los Angeles City Council from 1993 to 1998. He then became a state legislator, serving in the Senate from 1998 to 2006 and the Assembly from 2006 to 2007.

In 2007, Alarcon returned to the Los Angeles council, where he remained in office until 2013. The convictions pertained Alarcon’s most recent council term.

Prosecutors are requesting that he spend 180 days in jail and receive 1,000 hours of community service.

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  1. Citizen says:

    California has some real problems with voter fraud.

    California does not have a state wide voter data base. It is the only state that couldn’t get its act together to have a federally mandated state data base. Instead each county has to maintain its own voter database and people who want to vote in more than one county can do so because the separate databases are not connected. There are many more problems with our voting system allowing for voter fraud. If a county doesn’t maintain its database, and doesn’t purge dead people and invalid voters (people who have moved or not voted in the last 50 years) then they are tempting voter fraud by groups determined to elect their candidate by any means. LA County is the worst offender. They have polling places that don’t open with no instructions given for an alternate polling place. Bakersfield discovered 36 people registered with the address of a thrift shop. Yes, they voted. The Sec.of State’s office was found to be approving voter registrations when the applicant did not mark if they were a citizen or not. LA County had a polling place operated by someone who did not speak English. currently, the Election Integrity Project (a non partisan group) has turned in over 3000 cases of voter fraud and the Sec. of State’s Office has not done anything about it.

    Our Sec. of State, Debra Bowen, announced that she has “depression” and that’s why she hasn’t been able to go to work for a year or so. Of course, she should have resigned, but she didn’t. Our state voter system is in disarray. Pete Peterson is the only candidate who is pledging to construct the state wide database for voters; Padilla thinks the present system is fine.

    Check out the Election Integrity Project web site for more info about voter fraud in California.

    (1) 3 Total Votes - 2 up - 1 down
  2. Gordo says:

    What is sad is that I actually yawned out of boredom as I was reading the story. Stories like this used to be big news, but now they are commonplace; Richard Nixon was simply a man ahead of his time!

    (1) 1 Total Votes - 1 up - 0 down
  3. Mr. Holly says:

    Should have lived in SLO. Didn’t Settle’s live in a different location than where he should have.

    (8) 8 Total Votes - 8 up - 0 down
    • slosheepdog says:

      What? You mean you don’t really believe that Settle was living in a broom closet of a house rented to foreign exchange students during his tenure as a SLO politician? You can’t actually think he was living in that posh spread he built in Arroyo Grande while he was voting on issues affecting SLO. Can’t say the crooks we have in local politics who live in the areas they serve are any less corrupt. Shame on you for expecting that our political leaders should follow the same laws as the taxpayers.

      (8) 8 Total Votes - 8 up - 0 down
    • Citizen says:

      Allen Settle, who did live in AG while serving on the SLO Council, is the classic example of how SLO liberals protect their own from prosecution.

      (1) 3 Total Votes - 2 up - 1 down
  4. NorthCountyGuy says:

    A democrat convicted for committing a crime. What a concept!

    (16) 20 Total Votes - 18 up - 2 down
    • r0y says:

      He must have really pissed off the wrong people for this to happen. I mean, when they don’t circle the wagons and defend their ineptitude, malfeasance, and corruption right off the bat, then they must really hate this guy.

      The only reason I ever wish to see Republicans in office is purely because of the microscope they are typically under – I mean, they’re going to suck at their job as bad as a democrat, but at least they don’t get a complete pass; it is a rare thing to see a Democrat even asked a difficult question, let alone allowed to be busted for their horrible behavior.

      (5) 5 Total Votes - 5 up - 0 down
  5. Jorge Estrada says:

    Smiling faces, sometimes, they don’t tell the truth.

    (13) 13 Total Votes - 13 up - 0 down
  6. agag1 says:

    One down, how many more to go?

    (25) 25 Total Votes - 25 up - 0 down
  7. achillesheal says:

    What do you call a politician going to jail?

    A good start.

    (18) 20 Total Votes - 19 up - 1 down
  8. Rich in MB says:

    A Democrat committing voter fraud…isn’t this like a Dog bites man story….where is the news here?

    (8) 40 Total Votes - 24 up - 16 down
    • LameCommenter says:

      Amazing that this guy was prosecuted. Good job. Like Senator Rod Wright, the officials action was intentional. Wright cast scores of votes for damaging liberal legislation while illegally in office.

      This sort of thing gives one hope as a bright point of light and success at prosecution integrity. Cheers me up versus my general sadness as the USA system slides towards socialism and liberal muck.

      (19) 29 Total Votes - 24 up - 5 down
      • whatdouno says:

        You are right to a certain extent, however considering he was charged with 12 counts and was only convicted for this, it’s a somewhat hollow victory. Not much of an incentive to make a dent in the conscious of these criminals.

        (12) 14 Total Votes - 13 up - 1 down
        • kayaknut says:

          I am told they charge with many counts to encourage a plea bargain, if it was only a count or two defendants are more likely to go to court and take their chances, but when there are lots of counts it increases the chance for either a plea bargain or at least 1 or 2 convictions, which seems the case here

          (6) 8 Total Votes - 7 up - 1 down

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