Drug tunnel connected California home to Mexico

March 25, 2016

tunnelFederal agents uncovered a drug smuggling tunnel that connected a home in Calexico, California to a restaurant in Mexicali, Mexico. Agents also seized more than a ton of marijuana and arrested four people in connection with a Mexican drug cartel smuggling operation. [ABC News]

Immigration and Customs Enforcement investigators said traffickers paid $240,000 for a property located at 902 E. Third Street in Calexico. The traffickers then built a brand new $86,000 home with three bedrooms and two bathrooms in April 2015.

The home had a hole in the living room which gave access to the tunnel. The hole was about three feet wide, and it led to a shaft that descended about 32 feet underground connecting to the 415-yard tunnel.

Major drug trafficking organizations started using the tunnel last month.

U.S. attorney Laura Duffy said this was the first time that drug traffickers purchased a property and built a house for the sole purpose of concealing a drug tunnel in the area.

Investigators found bundles of marijuana wrapped in plastic inside the tunnel. They also found more marijuana at warehousing locations in Calexico. The marijuana totaled more than 1,350 pounds and had a a street value of about $6 million.

Agents made two arrests in Arizona and two in Calexico. The suspects face various charges.

Over the last five years, federal investigators have discovered more than 75 smuggling tunnels. Most have been located in California and Arizona.


Loading...

14 Comments

  1. Jorge Estrada says:

    There was no comment on the OSHA violations. The Feds will have to sell the pot to be paid for these violations. We can’t have safety violations that endanger innocent until prove guilty people. Don’t laugh……..

    (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down
  2. T-Bone says:

    El Chapo may be in prison again but nothing has changed. The war on drugs is a lost cause. All that is going on is the Fed Beast making money on the Prison Industrial Complex by putting people in jail for lengthy sentences on non violent crimes such as Marijuana type crimes.

    (4) 4 Total Votes - 4 up - 0 down
  3. Vagabond says:

    So much for Trumps wall

    (-2) 10 Total Votes - 4 up - 6 down
    • achillesheal says:

      Walls can also extend under the surface.

      Wall is a metaphor for enforcement of our borders. It will take a wall, surveillance, intelligence, and lots of bullets, but it can easily be done.

      (0) 4 Total Votes - 2 up - 2 down
  4. abigchocoholic says:

    Investigators found bundles of marijuana wrapped in plastic inside the tunnel. They also found more marijuana at warehousing locations in Calexico. The marijuana totaled more than 1,350 pounds and had a a street value of about $6 million.
    ——————————
    How many times do I have to say it? If it were legal, what would the price be? How many drug cartels would be dealing it?

    Hint: Coffee sells for about $7lb.

    Hint: Wheat sells for 4 cents a bushel.

    Hint: Corn sells for about $160 a ton.

    Do the math.

    (4) 6 Total Votes - 5 up - 1 down
    • achillesheal says:

      Why not extend your argument to heroin, cocaine, and meth and the thing they take that eats their flesh? If it were legal the drug cartels would be out of business thus all of these drugs should be legal.

      Hey, I just figured out a way to eliminate all crime. Make nothing illegal. What are we waiting for? A perfect society awaits.

      (-3) 3 Total Votes - 0 up - 3 down
      • tomjones says:

        Your argument makes no sense…suggesting that we make nothing illegal is making the argument that all behaviors are morally equivalent….murder, rape, or thievery is not the moral equivalent of smoking weed, shooting heroin, or drinking milk. This is a ridiculous notion, and your argument is therefore meaningless.

        Tell me again why heroin, cocaine and other serious drugs should not be legalized after 40 plus years of a failed policy prohibition and eradication…

        The argument is whether or not consumption of drugs should be considered a crime. I think it is obvious that considering the consumption of drugs as a crime in and of itself, as we have for the last 50 years or more, does not work.

        (1) 1 Total Votes - 1 up - 0 down
      • kettle says:

        achillesheal says:”Why not extend your argument to heroin, cocaine, and meth”

        Because no reasonable person wants that, to even bring it up is sophomoric.

        (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down
      • tictac1 says:

        Do you realize those drugs were once legal too? Did it set off a crime wave of unprecedented proportions? No, it did not.

        I challenge you to research the origins of our current drug policy, all the way back to Anslinger. You will find its roots in racism.

        Other failed prohibitions include: alcohol, 1920’s USA. tobacco, China, 1600’s (executed smokers), gambling, current USA (fantasy football, anyone?)

        Other countries have decriminalized hard drugs, and nothing bad happened. We keep these laws on the books because private prisons are profitable, the 14th amedment allows slavery for criminals, and our politicians are beholden to entities like Correction Corporations of America (big funding for Hillary, BTW).

        If you think the state should be allowed to tell people what they may and may not consume, you disavow the idea of one’s body being private property, which is to say there is no private property. Ah, the slippery slope to collectivism!

        (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down
    • demiseofslo says:

      That dirt mexican weed is worth nowhere near $6M. Probably closer to $100k at the most, and who buys that shit anyways? Its nothing but sticks, seeds, lizards, and dirt all ground up together.

      (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down
  5. JB Bronson says:

    While America prepares to elect Trump for his wall, the Mexicans are going, “Go ahead.”

    (-6) 18 Total Votes - 6 up - 12 down
  6. Rambunctious says:

    They sure went through a lot of trouble. All they had to do was fill the pockets of south American kids and they could have walked the drugs over the border and got a free education as well.

    (14) 32 Total Votes - 23 up - 9 down
  7. tomsquawk says:

    U.S. attorney Laura Duffy said this was the first time that drug traffickers purchased a property and built a house for the sole purposed of concealing a drug tunnel in the area.

    right.

    two questions; how are the chile rellenos at the restaurant? and, was the house at the end of the line an Airbnd?

    “Oh, mexico
    I never really been but Id sure like to go
    Oh, mexico
    I guess Ill have to go now”

    JT

    (8) 18 Total Votes - 13 up - 5 down

Leave a Comment