Point man in Cal Poly frat robbery takes plea deal

May 12, 2016
Cameron Akins

Cameron Akins

A former Cal Poly football player faces a minimum sentence of 4.5 years in prison for trying to rob a San Luis Obispo fraternity house at gunpoint. The former wide receiver pleaded no contest to several felonies on Wednesday.

Cameron Marcel Akins, 20, is the fifth and final former Cal Poly athlete to plead to criminal charges in the case. Akins is facing the stiffest punishment of the five defendants, a maximum sentence of 16 years in prison, according to the San Luis Obispo County District Attorney’s Office.

In Aug. 2014, San Luis Obispo police arrested five football players for attempting to rob the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity house.

Akins, the alleged point man in the robbery attempt, carried a .38-caliber Derringer-style pistol into the frat house, pointed it at fraternity members and demanded cash and drugs. Akins then fought and bit an officer prior to being arrested, according to the San Luis Obispo Police Department.

Police later arrested the former president of Delta Sigma Phi for selling marijuana out of the frat house. The former fraternity president pleaded no contest last year to possession of marijuana for sale.

Since then, former Cal Poly players Cortland Fort, Jake Brito, Dominique Love and Kristaan Ivory have pleaded no contest to conspiracy charges. Only Love received jail time. Love was sentenced to a year in jail.

On Wednesday, Akins pleaded no contest to charges including attempted home invasion, residential burglary and resisting a peace officer by use of force. Akins is scheduled to be sentenced on July 11 in the courtroom of Judge Donald Umhofer.

At the time of the break-in, Akins was slotted to be a starting wide receiver for the Mustangs. Ivory was the star of the team. None of the five players returned to the Cal Poly squad.


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11 Comments

  1. Russ J says:

    I wonder how much his sports scholarship was paying for. Most people who struggle financially can get loans. So sad that this guy threw his opportunity in the toilet.

    (1) 3 Total Votes - 2 up - 1 down
  2. achillesheal says:

    But for football, and based only on his academic record and essay writing skills on the Common Application, would this kid from Compton have ever been accepted to CalPoly?

    There are plenty of viable students with 3.8 GPAs who get turned away because they can’t catch a football and run a 4.5 -40.

    Note to the admissions office: They probably wouldn’t bring .38 caliber derringer pistols to campus, either.

    (11) 17 Total Votes - 14 up - 3 down
    • Kaiser Bill says:

      The Cal Poly football robbery of a frat that sold drugs is another example of why college sports must end.

      These entitled student athletes do not have the chops to get into a school on academic merits.

      You would think student athletes would be thankful for receiving a free education.

      No, the student athletes aren’t thankful! They want to be paid!

      End college sports and remove athletes from campuses where they don’t have the intellectual makeup to ever get in, let alone succeed academically.

      (4) 8 Total Votes - 6 up - 2 down
      • achillesheal says:

        There was an interesting story on HBO Real Sports recently about that very topic.

        Some smaller schools are eliminating football because it is a significant drain on resources and the bleeding is being offset by raising student fees to support the football program.

        I love sports – particularly football, and would not like to see it eliminated at large colleges where the football program is profitable (SEC, Big 12 etc..), but where mediocre schools field football teams that lose money, and let a potential criminal element into the university that have no other business being there, it makes one wonder.

        (-1) 1 Total Votes - 0 up - 1 down
        • Kaiser Bill says:

          Youth football clubs should be run and financed by the professional teams, as is the case in Europe where top soccer teams like Bayern Munich and FC Barcelona
          pay for youth academies to develop young players.

          High school and college sports are a nice tradition in America, but it is an activity that has nothing to do with education that creates a huge financial burden on the public schools and colleges. Little wonder why there are no school sports teams in the rest of the world.

          (-1) 1 Total Votes - 0 up - 1 down
  3. south says:

    Using the same analysis that anti gun advocates use, if there were no drugs there, there wouldn’t have been a break in. Ergo, do away with marijuana and *poof* no more burglaries. You see, it’s not the guy that’s at fault, it’s the drugs.

    (3) 17 Total Votes - 10 up - 7 down
  4. dogeatdog says:

    The crime he needs to be in jail for is attempted robbery with a gun. It does not matter he was trying to sell pot or robbing a bank for money, you don’t bring a weapon along.

    Anything could have happened by mistake and the gun discharged hurting or killing someone.

    I don’t care who you are and how young you are a gun pointed at you is terrifying

    (13) 15 Total Votes - 14 up - 1 down
  5. Perspicacious says:

    Unbelievable how many people, who have bright futures, screw it up beyond all comprehension.

    (27) 31 Total Votes - 29 up - 2 down
    • r0y says:

      It’s called youth.

      How’s the saying go, “Youth is wasted on the young!” (not meaning to quote an opprobrious progressive, but he at least got that witty phrase correct)

      (0) 2 Total Votes - 1 up - 1 down
      • achillesheal says:

        Agreed that many of us do stupid things in our youth – drinking and driving, shoplifting, fighting, racing in cars….fortunately armed robbery doesn’t come in to play for most kids.

        (2) 4 Total Votes - 3 up - 1 down

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