Detectives discover 4,111 marijuana plants at Nipomo property

June 29, 2016


The San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s narcotics unit found 4,111 marijuana plants while searching a property in Nipomo Tuesday. Detectives arrested two men but failed to catch three others who ran away.

At about 9 a.m., the narcotics unit served search warrants at two locations in the 300 block of S. Oakglen Avenue. Detectives arrested Nipomo resident Tony Lumbreras Soto, 47, at the first location. Soto was arrested for having a narcotics related warrant.ef74f6f8-d27d-43ad-a418-fce24e809426

When detectives searched the neighboring property, they found a marijuana grow in a makeshift greenhouse that contained 4,111 plants in varying size. Additionally, detectives found one ounce of methamphetamine packaged for sale, a half ounce of cocaine packaged for sale and a loaded rifle.

While at the location of the marijuana grow, detectives arrested Santa Maria resident Francisco Soto-Orduna, 42. Detectives charged Soto-Orduna with possession of a controlled substance for sale, possession of a controlled substance while armed with a loaded firearm and being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Three other male suspects took off running during the search of the property. Deputies searched for the suspects but did not locate them, and they remain on the loose.

Both Soto and Soto-Orduna remain in San Luis Obispo County Jail with their bail set at $50,000.

The investigation into the marijuana grow is ongoing. Detectives anticipate more charges will be filed in the near future.




  1. jimmy_me says:

    Is it true that the Sheriff’s Narcotics Unit rolled up to this bust in their new “land-panga”?

    (0) 6 Total Votes - 3 up - 3 down
  2. indigo1955 says:

    Very productive people growing plants that have many benefits. I see nothing wrong here.

    (8) 14 Total Votes - 11 up - 3 down
    • antishillnetwork says:


      meet indigo1991 :D

      While I absolutely love your enthusiasm for the benefits of Cannabis; I think some perspective is needed ;) .

      Previously; the Federal government would raid any property with more than 99 plants.( Could still get raided for less) I am not sure if the fed is still funded for these types of raids; though I think most people understand 4,000 plants is excessive; and would expect raised eyebrows from law enforcement. A competent grower knows they can have their needs taken care of while maintaining far less Cannabis. This amount of Plants honestly makes other growers look irresponsible and foolhardy. ( Not to mention the methamphetamine involved. Seems like this crew was more than your average friendly stoner; unfortunately )

      Do I agree individuals should be able to freely grow this plant? Indeed.

      Was this the proper method to orchestrate such an operation? Probably not.

      (6) 8 Total Votes - 7 up - 1 down
  3. jimmy_me says:

    I don’t get it. Millions upon millions of grape plants growing as far as the eye can see in every direction in SLO county. Liquor stores and bars on every corner. Yet marijuana is still illegal? Even when it is legalized in November, I can only possess relatively small quantities and grow very few plants. Yet I can clear-cut my property and grow as many grapes as I want. I can also buy a semi-truck and fill it with pallets full of wine. I just don’t get it.

    (11) 23 Total Votes - 17 up - 6 down
  4. mkaney says:

    This will create a vacuum in the local market, helping to bring in the cartels to fill it. The Sheriff will then have his justification for his gang task force. Dumb dumb dumb

    (-10) 38 Total Votes - 14 up - 24 down
    • DocT says:

      I’m gonna disagree with you RE local market shortage and cartels. There’s no money for “cartels” selling to CA or any other state with legal marijuana. Most likely this operation was selling to someone who distributes to other states. Just like with food or textile crops, CA feeds the world with weed too. This was for export, I’ll bet. No impact on the local market.

      As for cartels, have you noticed that they never traffic in booze anymore? Back during prohibition, the “cartels” were providing liquor. Today, they provide “narcotics.”

      Fully legalize it, abolish the “Narcotics Task Force” or whatever they call it now, and save a ton of tax money, free up space in the prisons for real criminals and stop harassing people!

      (4) 14 Total Votes - 9 up - 5 down
      • r0y says:

        While my libertarian side agrees with the “fully legalize it” part, the conservative part of me says, “then what will be next to fully legalize?” – there’s always SOMETHING to legalize.

        I would love to live in a world where people were responsible and “just smart enough” to not be the fools they prove to be, over and over. Then we could legalize everything from killing babies to meth and cocaine, and write it all off as “it’s MY body!” Unfortunately, that is pie-in-the-sky.

        (-3) 11 Total Votes - 4 up - 7 down
        • Russ J says:

          I here Amsterdam is a lovely place!

          (-4) 8 Total Votes - 2 up - 6 down
        • unlisted says:

          You’re correct, Roy. After legalizing one thing, people will always want to legalize something else.

          For example, after legalizing pot, Colorado decided to legalize harvesting rainwater! (I shit you not, look it up.)

          (3) 5 Total Votes - 4 up - 1 down
        • antishillnetwork says:

          Regardless; Prohibition of all substances has failed. The free market will always dominate. Legalization and regulation is the only logical answer; though people emotionally disagree.

          (0) 2 Total Votes - 1 up - 1 down
      • Side_Show_Bob says:

        Colorado’s state government is already realizing a shortfall in the tax on weed. Turns out, weed smokers are cheap and want the best deal without taxation so the black market weed is still an issue and the state is NOT reaping the benefits that so many pro-legalizers were espousing.

        (-1) 9 Total Votes - 4 up - 5 down
      • mkaney says:

        Whether cartels ACTUALLY fill the void isn’t necessarily relevant. Law enforcement will use it to build the narrative to suck more taxpayer money

        (1) 1 Total Votes - 1 up - 0 down

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