Paso Robles shooting sends man to hospital

August 28, 2011

A Paso Robles man remains in the hospital after being shot in the torso on Saturday at approximately 11:15 p.m.

Responding to calls of shots fired, police arrived at the 3200 block of Spring Street where they found an adult male victim. His condition had not being released as of Sunday morning.

The alleged shooter was seen running from the scene wearing a dark colored hooded sweatshirt. Police said he weighs approximately 160 pounds and is about 5 feet 8 inches tall.

A white, Chevrolet SUV was also observed leaving the scene soon after the shooting. Police are not sure if the vehicle is related to the incident. .

Investigators are still attempting to determine the motive for this shooting.


23 Comments

  1. inmyopinion says:

    I believe that all Paso Robles residents and business owners should be aware of an ongoing problem in Paso right now that PRPD is not putting out there. Might make them look bad but People need to stay alert and check their surroundings well before going out to your car parked in the alley’s and obscure parking lots around Paso. There are thugs hanging out to attack, mug and even just for fun violence against patrons of local pubs and bars heading back to their cars late at night.

    I know of one guy that PRPD picked up beaten and battered a few weeks back and instead of checking him out they threw him in the drunk tank and he woke up in jail. Only to plead with them that he was attacked and beaten. There is another instance where a guy with two girls was attacked a couple of weeks ago walking to the parking lot back by hunters auto body and was attacked by a couple of young men. The women just froze but when one guy ran, one of the women followed him to a waiting car with others in it, the group attacked for no reason other than maybe fun and games or gang initiation, YOU can guess that one. Regardless, PRPD is making no announcements to the local bars, pubs or dinner houses of these attacks. Yes, this is serious, but what can we do? PRPD just told these guys to not go out alone around here. See ya , have a good day. I know that a few residents are really steaming about this right now and calling for an investigation toot-sweet.

    We start by protecting ourselves and making sure we dont walk alone to our cars alone and park in well lit areas and make sure you know self-defencse. Good luck my friends

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 1

    • pasoparent5 says:

      The Paso Police Chief is incompetent and crime will continue to rise as long as she’s in charge.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 1

  2. pasoparent5 says:

    Hmmm…One of my boys is almost 5’6″ and owns a hoodie. He was in the Bay Area last night so he has an alibi. But how on earth will the real suspect be found when the cops won’t release the COLOR OF HIS SKIN?? Black, white or brown?? Which is it, Paso Police??

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0

  3. Cindy says:

    “not a Paso Robles bearcat hoodie…” LOL!!
    Upon seeing this headline and reading the brief, I immediately had the same thoughts that you express. What is happening to Paso Robles, the crime is rampant and the shootings seem to be occurring almost on a weekly basis? Little Salinas south is getting way too close to home.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 2

    • mkaney says:

      Now Cindy, don’t encourage all the drama queens, they aren’t occurring on anything remotely close to a weekly basis. Generally speaking, it would seem these shootings involve people that wouldn’t have a problem if they weren’t involved in some shadiness to begin with. These are not incidents of random violence. In the absence of any kind of legal recourse on the black market, this is how justice is served. If people don’t like it, then they need to extend the legal framework to include transactions that are currently not legal. Attempting to curtail the business through prohibition will never ever work no matter how much law enforcement focus is put onto the problem.

      Until then, everyone knows the price for getting involved with shady business.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 10

      • pasoparent5 says:

        Cindy’s not being a drama queen. Crime IS on the rise in Paso and your response–legalize drugs–isn’t the answer.

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 1

        • mkaney says:

          Do you have an answer? Or should we keep trying the same old thing? Even though history has demonstrated time and time again the point that prohibition makes problems less manageable? If you’ve got a new approach to handle the problem, I’d be happy to hear it.

          It’s not like the default state of drugs are illegal, and we are “making” them legal to combat a problem. The default state of everything is legal. When you outlaw it, and you wind up with worse problems, the logical thing is to reverse the action, as we found with alcohol.

          Legalizing drugs is not the radical position.. they were legal through the vast majority of the history of the United States.. Making them illegal was the radical position.

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 6

          • pasoparent5 says:

            Honestly, mkaney, I’ve never tried drugs in my life and drink about once a year on my birthday. I have no problem w/legalizing pot for private, recreational use and believe medical marijuana use should be legal, too. I don’t see pot smokers out committing a bunch of crimes; maybe they’re too lethargic to do so.

            My main concern is METH. That drug kills. That drug makes instant addicts who lie, steal, cheat and murder. Look at the Paso Farmhouse Motel stabbing just last week. Those 4 tweakers are baaaad news. Not sure how legalizing meth and other “hard drugs” will help the crime problem in Paso.

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 0

            • mkaney says:

              I understand your concern. But honestly, that drug does not make instant addicts who lie, steal, cheat and murder. If that were so, then 50% of college students would be doing these things. The fact is that amphetamines are an incredibly popular drug legally. There is almost no difference between meth and a drug like adderall, which we distribute like candy. In fact, most of the difference between the two lies in the dosage control. If one were to take the same amount of either drug, they would experience identical results.

              I realize that “tweakers” are not a myth and that there are patterns of bad behavior. However, I contend that most of these problems are not a result of the drug itself but in fact have 2 other causes. First, a correlation between people who have problems (and makes problems for other) and drug addiction, as opposed to a causal relationship. Second is the legal status of the drug, resulting in a downward spiral caused by legal consequences which lead to job loss, inability to pay for healthcare, mental and physical progblems resulting from the questionable quality of the drug itself, etc.

              If you look back at the campaign behind making marijuana illegal (or alcohol) you’ll see the same sort of concerns. These concerns were parroted over and over by law enforcement and government agencies. People believed it just as strongly as they perceive the meth problem. But, for the most part, it all turns out to be not true. I would bet that you encounter people every day that you do not think of as tweakers who are on some form of amphetamines whether legal or illegal, you just don’t notice because they don’t stand out. The most damaging drugs on the market, physically and psychologically, remain heroin and alcohol

              Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 4

              • FineWine says:

                I love how the liberal elite will argue to prove that there drug of choice is fine and everyone elses is bad. You can always tell because Marijuana good, Alcohol Bad, Meth good, Heroin Bad. The truth is most drugs have benefits and consequences including anti depressants and anti anxiety medications that are given out like candy these days. The truth is also tests for many of these drugs make it difficult to decipher whether someone was under the influence or not. We have several accurate tests for Alchohol. However, what law enforcement doesn’t want you to know most of the others we don’t. How many accidents are caused by people under the influence of drugs both over and under the counter that we never find out about.

                Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 4

                • mkaney says:

                  First, I’m so far from a liberal it’s not even funny. Apparently “you can’t always tell”, but because you perceive my view on this issue to fall the “left” side of the two-sided paradigm which has control over your thinking, then it just makes sense to you that I must fall into this stereotype. I am talking about relative damaging effect on drugs, I am not trying to say one is bad or good, or one should be made legal or not. A conservative who has a consistent thought process supports the deregulation of drugs.

                  You are correct about the automobile accidents. However, I do think that people should be held accountable for what they do, not what they *might* do or *why* they did it (unless we’re talking about extenuating circumstances like self defense in an assault). There are many things besides drugs that can cause people to drive poorly (even more poorly than someone on drugs), including being an asshole, putting on makeup, looking for a CD, having a bad day, yelling at the kids, and being tired (which is actually the most dangerous),

                  Why should it matter if it was kids they were yelling at or a drug they were on? Either one is really a lifestyle choice, and depending on the circumstances either one could be a drain on society or someone that contributes to society. That being said, I don’t really care if someone I get in a wreck with is on meth, or just having anger problems that caused them to drive erratically, they need to be responsible for their actions. That is ALL I care about.

                  Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 0

                • FineWine says:

                  Do you really think someone that may be upset should be prosecuted the same as person high on Meth??? Interesting

                  The purest in me does say legalize drugs. A person should be able to choose any behavior they want as long as it does not hurt others. Only problem is it can’t stop there. You need to get rid of all state sponsored health care and allow hospitals to turn drug addicts away, because I shouldn’t have to pay for it. That part will never happen.

                  Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 2

              • my2cents says:

                Yah! And Oxy Cotton (sp?) is a legal prescription, which is becoming just as big a problem as meth!!

                Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

            • mkaney says:

              Here’s an interesting fact that I hope serves as some food for thought.

              Year: 2007 Drug induced deaths*
              Legal drugs: 36,834
              Illegal drugs: 1,537

              *Death caused by adverse reaction or overdose

              Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

              • FineWine says:

                That just proves the prohibition of those illegal drugs is working because of less deaths. If you legalize drugs you will have more addicts. That doesn’t make it wrong. With alcohol you can not deny more people use it because its legal. If it was illegal less people would use it, but many would still use it, and that might be the answer. When people want something badly enough how do you keep it illegal as with marijuana. I don’t see a huge uprising for making harder drugs legal.

                Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

                • mkaney says:

                  Prohibition of those illegal drugs is working? Are you kidding? It is easier for a high school student to buy marijuana than it is beer. The reason you don’t see a huge uprising for making other drugs illegal is because of social stigma. There was not a large uprising for the legalization of marijuana 20 years ago. The other thing is that marijuana is a plant and relatively safe, and people have a certain resentment towards being told they can’t ingest a natural substance.

                  With regard to your other comment. Yes, I do believe that unless there are mitigating circumstances, that yes, a person should in fact get prosecuted the same whether they were upset or on meth if they caused an accident. In fact, if intent and premeditation are considered, then merely being upset should not effect your inhibitions so much that you don’t recognize you are in no state to drive… so absolutely, yes. What matters is how you effect those around you and whether you directly infringe on their safety or rights as a result of your actions.

                  Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

                • FineWine says:

                  Less deaths from illegal drugs! If you want to see more deaths make it legal. The legality of liquor has not made less people use it. Its just as easy to get for minors they just choose to use MJ.

                  Your last comment speaks for itself.

                  Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1

            • my2cents says:

              Do you know its our government who first made Meth?

              Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • Citizen says:

        The person murdered while doing his laundry on Spring St., was attacked by a mentally ill stranger from San Jose. The attack was entirely unprovoked and random.

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

        • mkaney says:

          “Generally speaking” was my qualifying preface. If you take random acts of violence as a percentage of overall, it’s a pretty small amount.

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • MaryMalone says:

        Consistently, one of the human reactions to tragedy to others is to immediately start listing reasons why it was the fault of the victim, because of some aberrant or dangerous behavior, that the shooting occurred.

        I think this is perfectly normal, and is a coping mechanism to help us deal with the increased threat to ourselves that every tragedy to others bring.

        However, it can make us less vigilant and may not allow us to take the safety measures needed to protect ourselves from the tragedy the victim suffered.

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        • mkaney says:

          I didn’t mean to come off like I was blaming the victim, and should anyone be familiar with them I apologize if it came off that way. I said what I did in the context of what policies should a society adopt towards things that, statistically speaking, may not greatly effect people external to the particular situation/circumstances.

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  4. easymoney says:

    Paso is turning into Salins south. Lots of shootings and stabbings with descriptions like “The alleged shooter was seen running from the scene wearing a dark colored hooded sweatshirt.”
    And my money says it was not a Paso Robles bearcat hoodie…

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 3

Comments are closed.