CalCoastNews Series

Eyes on your water

More than two years ago (Feb 2014), CalCoastNews published the first of a three-part series, “Eyes on Your Water,” examining the people, the politics, and the provable prevarications behind the proposed Paso Robles Basin water district.

The series, written by Senior Correspondent Daniel Blackburn, reported on the movers and shakers promoting the district plan — some of the state’s largest water figures — who may have ulterior motives beyond those being presented to North County voters. With a mail-in election concluding in March, this series takes on new and important significance.

Who needs the district? And why? “Local control” — proponents’ primary claim for its justification — actually has little to do with the current plan. Rather, with a new district emerges the opportunity for great profits for a very few.

Is the the public’s interest being served by this water district proposal?

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A crafted perception of water district ‘cooperation’

Eyes On Your Water: Third in a series of reports on the North County’s festering water politics. By DANIEL BLACKBURN A surprise voting maneuver — engineered by its leader — divided a local landowners’ group and greased the skids for a plan to create a controversial water district regulating use of the Paso Robles basin.... (Continue Reading)

Paso water group wields major-league muscle

Eyes on your water: Second in a series of reports on the North County’s festering water politics. A list of the top 30 land owners over the Paso Robles aquifer is available below this story. By DANIEL BLACKBURN Some of California’s biggest players in water politics have become influential figures in the leadership of a... (Continue Reading)

Is water banking in SLO County’s future?

Eyes on your water: First in a series of reports on the North County’s festering water politics. By DANIEL BLACKBURN Little San Luis Obispo County is poised to become a major player in the West’s high-stakes water future, even while local land-owning water users fret about declining supplies stressed by an increasingly voracious agricultural thirst.... (Continue Reading)