Feds rationalize pot law pursuit

February 28, 2012

A top U.S. attorney Tuesday reemphasized the federal government’s continuing interest in busting medical marijuana dispensaries in California. In a Sacramento Press Club talk, Benjamin Wagner of the Eastern District attempted to explain the reasons that stepped-up enforcement has resulted in numerous raids, property seizures, and criminal charges. [SacramentoBee]

Wagner and other U.S. attorneys from this state have argued in the past that the 16-year-old medical marijuana law has been “hijacked by profiteers” and that they intend to push forward to enforcement of federal pot laws, even in other states where it is legal.

The voter-approved Proposition 215 has been targeted by federal authorities with increasing gusto under the Obama Administration, contrary to promises made by the president during his campaign.



  1. The Gimlet Eye says:

    In Bad Company: Mexico Arrests Three Army Generals, US War for Drugs Continues


    (1) 1 Total Votes - 1 up - 0 down
  2. hotdog says:

    I’m a dedicated Obama supporter but this and some other issues have shaken my resolve. I sent a scathing message to the white house, why don’t you do that too?

    (10) 14 Total Votes - 12 up - 2 down
  3. srichison says:

    A candidate campaigns on the platform of changing the way things are done in Washington. The candidate wins, and nothing changes. In fact, the very things the candidate railed against are now those things he is expanding. BUT, no one who supported him blames him. It’s not his fault – “big pharma” is the culprit for forcing him to be in their pocket. What’s wrong with this picture?

    (17) 23 Total Votes - 20 up - 3 down
    • Typoqueen says:

      There’s been a lot of change and that you don’t see that is telling, perhaps pick up an LA Times from time to time. Health care reform, all of the major operatives that caused 911 are dead or captured, that’s just two big changes, Obama’s doing a good job under extremely difficult circumstances. I don’t believe that any president has had the challenges that Obama’s had to face.

      Unfortunately to play on a level field anyone running for office these days must take money from big corps or else they won’t be elected. We would have nothing but republicans (what a nightmare). I don’t like the big corps running this country and that is what I keep yelling about but that’s just the way it is right now. Until we can get money out of politics things won’t change in regards to the all of our politians (and us) being owned. We are slaves for the big corps..

      (-6) 34 Total Votes - 14 up - 20 down
      • srichison says:

        You miss the point. The campaign issue was changing the way we do business in Washington. In other words, changing HOW things get done, not so much changing WHAT gets done. As regards changing the culture of Washington (how we do business), this administration is a failure. It may well be that it is an impossible task – but he was a Senator and knew that when he made the promise. In fact, he broke the promise before being elected when he refused matching funds so he could take PAC and corporate money even before being elected. They all promise. They all have no intention of keeping those promises – in other words, they lie. He’s no different.

        (9) 21 Total Votes - 15 up - 6 down
  4. The Gimlet Eye says:

    Connection? Remember, illegal drugs are used as an alternate currency and to finance “black ops.”

    North Korea is counterfeiting US dollars estimated between $15 million to hundreds of millions to prop up its flagging economy. [The US will do nothing about it except offer to give the counterfeiters the money outright if they will just stop printing it. Note that this article is a propaganda piece advocating a cashless society, so all financial transactions can be monitored – to fight crime and counterfeiting, of course.]
    Yahoo 2012 Feb 24


    (3) 5 Total Votes - 4 up - 1 down
  5. bobfromsanluis says:

    If anyone has any doubt at all about the why this is being done, and who is going to ultimately going to gain from the federal program of going after any and all marijuana, medical or not, state voter approved or not, look no further than Big Pharma, the private prison industry, and every single layer of law enforcement. Those corporations, industries and groups all are influencing the federal push because they are realizing a financial gain, while the criminal groups may not have any ability to influence federal policy, they too are gaining financially from this very wrong headed approach to an antiquated “prohibition” type of attack on so many people who are finding medical benefits from the use of MMJ and certain providers who offer a supply not connected to the usual criminal elements. I am beyond frustrated by the Obama Administration continuing the persecution of marijuana distribution for medical reasons that have approved by a majority of voters in many states; my hope is that once we get past the November elections, perhaps we can finally appeal to President Obama in his second term to “get smart” about marijuana, reclassify it differently than a Schedule One drug, allow true scientific medical research, allow the growing of non-thc containing hemp, and let the states decide what is the best policy for them regarding the laws about marijuana use, growing, distribution and selling. Ron Paul may have “one” good idea in his approach to relaxing or elimination of drug laws, but he is completely off base in wanting corporations a completely unregulated ability to harm the citizens of the US in their quest for profits above all else without regard to the harm that will follow.

    (9) 21 Total Votes - 15 up - 6 down
    • The Gimlet Eye says:

      “Ron Paul may have “one” good idea in his approach to relaxing or elimination of drug laws, but he is completely off base in wanting corporations a completely unregulated ability to harm the citizens of the US in their quest for profits above all else without regard to the harm that will follow.”

      Ron Paul has never stood for any such preposterous thing.

      The US intelligence agencies working hand in hand with the Mafias are running the drug trade.

      (8) 12 Total Votes - 10 up - 2 down
      • bobfromsanluis says:

        “Ron Paul has never stood for any such preposterous thing.” You could be correct; Congressman Paul may have never said what I wrote, but he is a firm believer in Libertarian ideals; less government, less regulation, less oversight, more privatization of government services regardless of whether or not the government can do the job better. Libertarian policies do not work, there has never been a government that operates on Libertarian principles, other than current day Somalia. Corporations operate by law with the intention, the purpose of making profit above all else. Some corporations also try to do the “right” thing by being morally conscientious, but some would rather not have to follow any laws if they could get away with it so they can make even more profit. Libertarians would have corporations police themselves with no protections in place for the general public concerning clean water, clean air, lead paint on children’s toys, etc, etc.
        As for US intelligence agencies being involved with organized crime and the importation and distribution of illegal drugs in the United States, I can certainly give that possibility some credence.

        (-1) 9 Total Votes - 4 up - 5 down
        • The Gimlet Eye says:

          You make Libertarians sound like the mafia. Come on! For thousands of years, liberty and free markets were not tried.

          Does it follow that they will never work simply because they were not tried for so long? Non sequitur. The problems we suffer from are not failures of free markets; they are failures of GOVERNMENT. The failures of government and the rule of law are separate matters and not the fault of the free market.

          At least you acknowledge the participation of US intelligence agencies in the importation and distribution of illegal drugs in the United States. I give you credit for that. Question: Why is NORAD not preventing the drugs from getting into our country?

          (1) 5 Total Votes - 3 up - 2 down
          • bobfromsanluis says:

            Gimlet: I’m not sure that the moderator would give us enough space on this thread to fully flush out the failings and shortfalls of Libertarianism, but I will try to give a couple of brief responses to your assertions. For most citizens of the world, liberty was not available for a really long time, and still isn’t in some parts of the world, but other than tariffs on imported goods, all markets were very “free” of oversight, regulation and rules with the saying “buyer beware” being an attempt to tell consumers to be careful with what they were buying. Local markets certainly kept control over the sellers by the fact that they lived right there also, so they had to perform to keep a reputation. Having global markets introduces whole sets of potential problems that can only be addressed by regulation and oversight. Did you happen to feed any of your pets food made in China that was poisoned and your pet died? That was due to a lack of oversight and inspection, not corruption on our government’s part. My assertion is that failures of oversight and regulation is due to either possible corruption and/or collusion between a regulator or inspector and the business/industry they are supposed to oversee or you have politicians in place that will defund an agency to the point that they cannot do the job they are supposed to do, which has happened more with Republicans than Democrats. A truly “free market” would have absolutely no oversight, no regulation, no enforcement, so guaranties of safety and no protections for the discharging of pollutants or toxic waste, spent nuclear fuel or radioactive waste. If you seriously believe that companies would continue to operate in the same manner as they have to now if all of the sudden all regulations, enforcement and oversight went away tomorrow, you really do not have a grasp on reality.
            As far as NORAD, I have no idea what is going on or not; is it possible that the federal government has some in positions of authority that push an agenda? Yes.

            (1) 5 Total Votes - 3 up - 2 down
            • The Gimlet Eye says:

              No, no, no. You are quite wrong. You are assuming the absence of the rule of law. Why would you assume such a thing? There is no justification for that whatsoever.

              Why are you so afraid of being free? The rampant corruption we face NOW is mostly the result of the criminal interlocking relationships which constitute the power structure under which we live at this time.

              (-2) 4 Total Votes - 1 up - 3 down
              • bobfromsanluis says:

                What is this “free” you speak of, if you are not speaking of being free from all laws, rules and regulations? I was “free” to not go hear Ann Coulter speak at Poly; I am “free” to buy my food anywhere I want to spend my money; I am free to come here and banter back and forth with people like you, I am not “afraid” of being free in the concept of free will, of making a choices that I want to. If you are saying that the rule of law would not be abandoned with the implementation of libertarian policies, you will have to do a better job of explaining exactly how you can have rules, regulations, laws that include oversight and inspection and still call that a “free” market.

                (1) 5 Total Votes - 3 up - 2 down
                • The Gimlet Eye says:

                  Why would you assume that I mean “being free from all laws, rules and regulations?”

                  That’s crazy. No economy or society can function without the rule of law. That’s non-negotiable.

                  But at the same time, we do not have a true free market. We are terribly overregulated. And what do we get for all this overregulation? Less freedom! A less robust economy! More unemployment! More poverty! More of the POLICE STATE!

                  (-3) 5 Total Votes - 1 up - 4 down
                • bobfromsanluis says:

                  Wow. Let me try this O N E M O R E T I M E ; what is the libertarian ideal of a “free market”? You (and by you I mean apparently ALL Libertarians) always make a big stinking deal about “overregulation equals less freedom”, but when I ask you about no regulation, no rules, no laws, no enforcement, you make the point that no economy or society can function without the rule of law. Please answer the question: What is a “free market”?

                  (-1) 1 Total Votes - 0 up - 1 down
                • The Gimlet Eye says:

                  A “free market” is a mechanism for the improvement of society. It is a system of VOLUNTARY exchange of goods and services.

                  In Murray Rothbard’s words, it is “a summary term for an array of exchanges that take place in society.”


                  (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down
  6. Maxfusion says:

    Research GW pharmaceutical and monies funneled through Canada to Obama.


    And to think, you actually believed him. Whaaaa ha ha ha

    The Great Leader will decide what medications you use. The Great Leader will decide what type of milk you drink. The Great Leader will decide what type of lunch your children will eat. The Great Leader will tell you what lightbulbs you can use. More later on Great Leader Media, and remember, viewing is mandatory. Don’t disappoint The Great Leader.

    (6) 18 Total Votes - 12 up - 6 down
    • Typoqueen says:

      I’ve always said that big pharma had Obama and that’s why he’s pursuing this. But your ungreat leaders do the same thing and in many cases worse,,ALL OF THEM. Cheney helped start a war(,,,Halliburton,,) for profit. So perhaps you need to learn that this corrupt system of letting corps own for our leaders is wrong. You and your con SCOTUS with your corps are people mentality is was is causing this. Obama is wrong but he’s not the only one. It’s gotten to a point that we can’t have a poltician that isn’t corp. owned. It’s become a fact of life.

      (-3) 13 Total Votes - 5 up - 8 down
      • The Gimlet Eye says:

        Typoqueen, what the hell is the matter with you? Have you become one of Mises’ disciples? You sound like ME talking here!!! You are supposed to be on the other side of the fence!!!!!!!

        I’m going to tear my hair out!!!!!!!

        (2) 6 Total Votes - 4 up - 2 down
        • Typoqueen says:

          “You sound like ME talking here”

          Bite your tongue!

          One difference between us is that I can admit the failings of the people that I support. I know that there is a problem which reaches all sides on this issue. But I have yet to hear you say anything about getting corps out of our politicians pockets, which includes dems AND republicans.

          (1) 7 Total Votes - 4 up - 3 down
          • The Gimlet Eye says:

            “getting corps out of our politicians pockets.”

            I think you have that backwards.

            Otherwise, you sound like a damned Libertarian!

            I can’t stand it!

            (0) 6 Total Votes - 3 up - 3 down
            • Typoqueen says:

              Yes, I’ve been told on several occasions in this forum that I have that backwards but I feel that they are in each others pockets, they make money for each other.

              I’m proud to be a liberal Democrat, not as lib as some but much more than others and the older I get the more lib I become. Obama has said that he wants the money out of politics but he can’t change the SCOTUS. He has to be owned by the corps, he has no choice. But I don’t think he has to do things such as these drug busts to appease his financiers so yes, I’m disappointed in that. I would hope that everyone finds fault even with those that that they support. I am a huge Jerry Brown fan, I think he’s great, the best gov. this states ever seen (in my lifetime), I would vote for him to be president in a heartbeat. But I don’t agree with everything he does ie the sales tax and the thousands of govt. employee layoffs. It’s not natural to agree with everything someone else believes, sometimes we must compromise.

              It’s pretty apparent that money is the root of evil when it comes to politics. I don’t feel that you will find a lib/dem that doesn’t agree with that.

              (0) 8 Total Votes - 4 up - 4 down
      • Maxfusion says:

        Bait and switch alert!!!!!!! Uh like I’m all typo queen, the conversation is about the Obama administration overriding the will of California voters in the matter of medical marijuana. The blame Bush game is so yesterday.

        (5) 9 Total Votes - 7 up - 2 down
        • Typoqueen says:

          I didn’t blame Bush for this, get a grip. Bush screwed up enough things I don’t need to add more. You’re right, Obama shouldn’t over-ride the people of Ca..

          (-3) 5 Total Votes - 1 up - 4 down
          • The Gimlet Eye says:

            God, I can’t stand agreeing with you, I’m biting my tongue and gritting my teeth, but you are absolutely right. Bush was and is a gd crook. So is BHO. He should not be interfering here.

            What, are you impersonating a Libertarian?

            (2) 2 Total Votes - 2 up - 0 down
  7. danika says:

    Pot is the least of our concerns at this point. I’d like them to spend this much effort on crime that actually matters, like the murder in the Fast & Furious.

    (5) 11 Total Votes - 8 up - 3 down
    • Typoqueen says:

      It should concern you. We are losing millions of dollars in revenue because of this war on pot.

      (12) 14 Total Votes - 13 up - 1 down
      • danika says:

        Not what I meant. I do believe we are losing millions of dollars in revenue and MJ should be legalized and taxed for revenue. I don’t believe the government is working in our best interest in this issue and their false claim of it being for our safety is b.s.. I find it more and more difficult to believe our government works to our benefit in most issues.

        And I also gave you a thumbs up!

        (8) 8 Total Votes - 8 up - 0 down
  8. Cindy says:

    ******************RON PAUL in 2012******************

    (2) 22 Total Votes - 12 up - 10 down
    • The Gimlet Eye says:

      Amen, Cindy! Ron Paul is the man of the hour!

      (-2) 18 Total Votes - 8 up - 10 down
    • Typoqueen says:

      LOL I knew you couldn’t stay away, admit it, you missed me!

      No votes for racism in 2012=no Ron Paul. Why would you support a known racist?

      (5) 13 Total Votes - 9 up - 4 down
      • danika says:

        Better the devil you know than the one you don’t.

        (4) 8 Total Votes - 6 up - 2 down
      • The Gimlet Eye says:

        And you, a stickler for the facts! Shame on you! Ron Paul is no more a racist than you are a Martian!

        Those comments were written without his authorization or knowledge. That is what he has repeatedly stated. I’ve been following Ron Paul for years. He’s a good man, a great politician, has a wonderful resume, and we are in desperate need of more men like him. He hits a home run every time he opens his mouth! Look at his bio:

        Congressman Ron Paul of Texas enjoys a national reputation as the premier advocate for liberty in politics today. Dr. Paul is the leading spokesman in Washington for limited constitutional government, low taxes, free markets, and a return to sound monetary policies based on commodity-backed currency. He is known among both his colleagues in Congress and his constituents for his consistent voting record in the House of Representatives: Dr. Paul never votes for legislation unless the proposed measure is expressly authorized by the Constitution. In the words of former Treasury Secretary William Simon, Dr. Paul is the “one exception to the Gang of 535″ on Capitol Hill.

        Ron Paul was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Gettysburg College and the Duke University School of Medicine, before proudly serving as a flight surgeon in the U.S. Air Force during the 1960s. He and his wife Carol moved to Texas in 1968, where he began his medical practice in Brazoria County. As a specialist in obstetrics/gynecology, Dr. Paul has delivered more than 4,000 babies! He and Carol, who reside in Lake Jackson, Texas, are the proud parents of five children and have eighteen grandchildren.

        While serving in Congress during the late 1970s and early 1980s, Dr. Paul’s limited-government ideals were not popular in Washington. He served on the House Banking committee, where he was a strong advocate for sound monetary policy and an outspoken critic of the Federal Reserve’s inflationary measures. He also was a key member of the Gold Commission, advocating a return to a gold standard for our currency. He was an unwavering advocate of pro-life and pro-family values. Dr. Paul consistently voted to lower or abolish federal taxes, spending, and regulation, and used his House seat to actively promote the return of government to its proper constitutional levels. In 1984, he voluntarily relinquished his House seat and returned to his medical practice.

        Dr. Paul returned to Congress in 1997 to represent the 14th Congressional district of Texas. He serves on the House Financial Services Committee and the Foreign Affairs Committee. On the Financial Services Committee, Rep. Paul serves as the chairman of the Subcommittee on Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology. He continues to advocate a dramatic reduction in the size of the federal government and a return to constitutional principles.

        Dr. Paul is the author of several books, including The Revolution: A Manifesto, End the Fed, Liberty Defined, Challenge to Liberty; The Case for Gold; and A Republic, If You Can Keep It. He has been a distinguished counselor to the Ludwig von Mises Institute, and is widely quoted by scholars and writers in the fields of monetary policy, banking, and political economy. He has received many awards and honors during his career in Congress, from organizations such as the National Taxpayers Union, Citizens Against Government Waste, the Council for a Competitive Economy, and countless others.

        Dr. Paul’s consistent voting record prompted one Congressman to comment that “Ron Paul personifies the Founding Fathers’ ideal of the citizen-statesman. He makes it clear that his principles will never be compromised, and they never are.” Another Congresswoman added that “There are few people in public life who, through thick and thin, rain or shine, stick to their principles. Ron Paul is one of those few.”

        (3) 5 Total Votes - 4 up - 1 down
        • Typoqueen says:

          Thanks for the shinning resume but you’ve left out a few things. Here are so more of his principles. You can defend him all you want but it’s a fact is that he is a racist. You should be ashamed to defend a known racist.


          “In 1999, he was the only member of Congress to oppose the issuing on a Congressional Gold Medal to Rosa Parks. In May 2011, Ron Paul said in an interview that he opposes the Civil Rights Act of 1964.”

          There’s much more on that link besides that. You might not like the source but there are plenty of sources to back everything up. I can find many more links if you don’t like this one, it was just simplest one to read.

          But go ahead, tell the truth, you don’t care do you? You will still back him, loyal devotion to a fault,,like a sheep following his leader over the cliff.

          (-2) 8 Total Votes - 3 up - 5 down

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