SLO police officer pleads not guilty to extortion and bribery

April 18, 2013

drub needleA San Luis Obispo Police Department narcotics officer plead not guilty to bribery and extortion charges related to allegations he manipulated others to sell drugs for him on April 15 in federal district court in Los Angeles. [NewTimes]

Cory Pierce, 39, who is also accused of stealing drugs from the SLO County Sheriff Department’s evidence locker, remains on paid administrative leave.

A local probationer said Pierce manipulated him and his girlfriend into selling or trading drugs for Pierce which they did on about 80 occasions.

Pierce also told the probationer that he could work off a heroin charge if he cooperated, the federal attorney’s office in Los Angeles said in a press release. Pierce would provide the probationer and his girlfriend placebo pain pills to trade for real pain pills or drugs used for his heroin addiction.

Federal agents arrested Pierce on Feb. 5 after a two-week sting operation.

District Judge Margaret M. Morrow has scheduled Pierce’s trial date for May 10.

 


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19 Comments

  1. seesfarther says:

    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/52426995/ns/local_news-san_luis_obispo_ca/

    (Pleads guilty to extortion.)

    (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down
  2. jumping in says:

    Although nothing surprises me our county citizens should demand answers when these situations happen. First the common citizen is generally over-charged with multiple offenses when arrested whereas Cory didn’t even get charged for theft or half of the other offenses he stated. I am pretty sure if I broke into the SLOPD evidence room and stole property the number of offenses wouldn’t fit on the front page of The Trib , I wouldn’t be out on a $10,000 bail, my case wouldn’t have magically been moved to L.A. and I probably would loose my job due to the multiple court dates I would be attending not to mention the smearing of my name. And what again is internal affairs job?

    (15) 17 Total Votes - 16 up - 1 down
    • Cindy says:

      I think his case is in LA because it is the Feds who took over the investigation and it is the Feds who charged him. Federal cases go to trial in L.A.

      (2) 2 Total Votes - 2 up - 0 down
  3. msminiver says:

    Why is he still being paid? That’s a good question and the simple answer is top level managers promote this practice simply because when they get caught with their hands in the perverbial cookie jar they will get paid too, until they are convicted? However, if you appeal the conviction the pay continues and has no end date. Mark Rizzo was still being paid last time I checked.

    (14) 16 Total Votes - 15 up - 1 down
    • kayaknut says:

      This is true, first a conviction should result is their pay stopping, if the convicted decides to appeal fine, but no more “on paid leave”, and second why paid leave?, Unions of course, so if we have to have it, isn’t there something those who would be be on leave could do? community service? cleaning out patrol cars? office cleaning(including bathrooms?, filing? just nothing with a badge or gun and if they need to take time off for court dates, then use some of that over accumilated(many times beyond legal limits) vacation, third of which should never be allowed to accumilate to that level, either use it or loose it, and minimum just pay it out each year.

      But again why doesn’t this happen, UNIONS

      (4) 6 Total Votes - 5 up - 1 down
    • obispan says:

      He’s being paid because it is the city’s choice that he not work in the absence of proof of a fire-able offense. Needless to say that proof is forthcoming. Note the absence of this story in The Tribune, now nothing more than an ad sheet annoyingly stuffed in my mailbox.

      (1) 1 Total Votes - 1 up - 0 down
  4. The Daily says:

    It would be nice if the media would show a picture of Cory. Why the secrecy? Plenty of mug shots of other’s criminal mug shots are shown.

    (19) 21 Total Votes - 20 up - 1 down
  5. Jorge Estrada says:

    If we had swift justice, Cory would have been guilty as drug tested.

    (8) 10 Total Votes - 9 up - 1 down
  6. lakerhater says:

    Why is he still being paid?

    (18) 20 Total Votes - 19 up - 1 down
    • Niles Q says:

      It’s called innocent until proven guilty, I guess. Or a good contract through the police union, morre likely.
      The SLOPD should have fired him before the FBI arrested him. Maybe then they could have gotten out of paying him.
      Once he’s convicted. his paycheck will stop but probably not his pension when he turns 50.
      Let’s see, arrested in February, arraigned in April and trial date May 10? That’s pretty swift justice.

      (9) 11 Total Votes - 10 up - 1 down
  7. pasoparent5 says:

    Surveillance cameras are everywhere these days. Wasn’t there one monitoring the Sheriff’s evidence locker area?

    (22) 24 Total Votes - 23 up - 1 down
    • kayaknut says:

      The police union wil not allow cameras to watch their members

      (12) 24 Total Votes - 18 up - 6 down
      • kayaknut says:

        Just like the union will not allow “true” random drug testing

        (18) 24 Total Votes - 21 up - 3 down
      • pasoparent5 says:

        WOW kayak…seriously?! That’s just plain stupid.

        The “little people” like us get monitored at the store, at the bank, at intersections, in urban downtown areas…yet no cameras are posted around evidence storage areas–lockers containing guns, cash, drugs, etc…

        Our world’s an upside down place. :(

        (18) 20 Total Votes - 19 up - 1 down
      • r0y says:

        Neither will the Teacher’s Union… why do you think all those gun-free zones have no footage of anything, ever?

        Just something to think about.

        (8) 14 Total Votes - 11 up - 3 down
        • kayaknut says:

          The same goes for the prision guard union, they do not allow cameras in areas of prisions reserved for only guards and support personal, (areas prisoners not allowed in), why would this be?

          (6) 14 Total Votes - 10 up - 4 down
  8. Cindy says:

    “Pierce would provide the probationer and his girlfriend placebo pain pills to trade for real pain pills or drugs used for his heroin addiction.”

    It isn’t clear who had the heroine addiction, Pierce or the probationer.

    (12) 18 Total Votes - 15 up - 3 down
    • The Gimlet Eye says:

      The black ops guys are too smart for that (usually). The dope is for the dupes and the down and out.

      Sarcastically speaking, I don’t know why this is such a big deal. He’s only doing what the CIA black ops guys are doing. The American banking system could not even function without money laundering involving dope.

      If dope’s good enough for them, it’s good enough for him.

      (4) 10 Total Votes - 7 up - 3 down

Comments are closed.