Morro Bay power plant to shut down in February

November 9, 2013

morro bay stacksDynegy announced plans to retire its 50-year old Morro Bay natural gas-fired power plant in February because the plant is no longer profitable.

Company spokeswoman Katy Sullivan said Dynegy was unable to get a long-term power sales contract to keep the 650-megawatt plant economically viable. In addition, in order to comply with a recently implemented California policy that restricts and phases out the use of estuary, delta and ocean water for cooling coastal power plants, the aging facility would require a significant investment.

There are currently 30 to 40 people working at the plant. Dynegy officials said employees will be offered jobs at other facilities otherwise they will be given a severance payment.

Dynegy officials have not yet decided what they will do with the property.

 


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shelworth

Remember what happened to Avila! It went from being a great little beach town to whatever it is now, It’s like Walt Disney remade it. Sad.


probiz

Some would say Avila is pretty great now.


P. Enis

It’s for Fresnoids now.


shelworth

A glass platform surrounding the top of the three stacks (like the platform over the Grand Canyon), and an elevator up the inside of one of the stacks. 25 bucks a pop for tourists, 5 bucks for locals. Ta-daa. Or better yet, a rotating restaurant! With a seashell motif!


shelworth

people in Morro Bay are sorely lacking a sense of humor.


kayaknut

A lack of humor is not lacking only in Morro Bay, try most of the central coast.


givemeabreak2

I think Dennis millier is funny when he’s on bill O’RIelly show.


slophocles

Here’s a newsflash for people that don’t get out of Morro Bay that often:You can walk into ANY small town in America and no matter how wonderful or horrible that place is, you will find the same core of groveling, grumbling, soon-to-be-extinct, self-appointed “locals” projecting all their fears and insecurities onto “transplants,” immigrants,” “newcomers.” Believe me, right now there are a group of “locals” sitting around a pot of coffee in Kettleman talking about how good things were before “they” came and it was just “we”. It’s not “they” their afraid of – it’s the “C-word”: ch-ch-ch-change.


Laughlines

Here’s another news flash: you can walk into ANY small town on the Central Coast, and find the same core of groveling, grumbling, soon-to-be-extinct, self-appointed “enlightened” people who have arrived in all their majesty to minister to the poor benighted fools who, prior to their propitious arrival, merely stumbled along in ignorance and darkness. Their motto is: “I just love it here! Now it’s time to change everything.” I came here at age five, and when I was 13 or 14 one of my best friend’s Mom told me that I was “…almost getting to be a local.” This was from a woman whose family ties here went back to the days of Father Serra. It used to mean something to be a local, now anyone who shows up is an Insta-Local, fully vested in the community and totally qualified to pass judgment on everyone else. Whenever I see someone with an “I Love the SLO Life” license plate frame, I know they just got here. It’s not about being “afraid” of change, it’s about having some respect for traditions, and seniority, and not presuming to just show up and start telling all the old-timers how screwed up they are and how you’re going to show them the error of their ways, whether they like it or not. If all the locals are so stupid, how did they manage to create a community that attracted you in the first place? You need to do some careful self-examination. Good luck.


slophocles

Laughlines, I feel bad for you. You can’t control where people go and you can’t stop people from wanting to improve things. You should really stop taking things so personally.


Laughlines

Well, first of all, I can get along just fine without your feelings. Please keep them to yourself. Secondly, not only do I not want to control where people go, I’ve devoted a considerable portion of my life to ensuring that you and all other Americans are free to go where you will and speak your minds as you please. You’re welcome. Now then, I’ve earned the same right for myself. And you should already know that “improve” is a relative term. By my lights, much of what’s happened here is not improvement. Home prices rising from under $25/square foot to $250-$900/square foot is not an improvement. Having more antique stores than even Starbucks stores (and how is that even possible?) is not an improvement. You presume to know how to “improve” that which many others feel is just fine, you tell us that you know better than we do, and then you say, “…stop taking things so personally.” You’re way out of line, and you should check yourself. That’s MY Constitutionally-protected opinion.


WiserGuy

You are talking out of both sides of your mouth. On one post you claim that the power plant helped boost property values, and now in another post you complain about the increase in home prices which you say is, and I quote, “not an improvement.”


I think you have a lot of personal issues swirling in your head and your emotions have gotten the better of you as you try to blame your unhappiness on outsiders and people who have a different vision of Morro Bay than you have.

And then you have the nerve to start bragging and acting like you are someone extra special as you claim to have done something to ensure I have the right to speak my mind. Dude, LOTS of people can say the same thing, and you don’t’ have to have been employed by the tax payers to make that claim. And it certainly does NOT give you more rights than other citizens.


You also act like you have some special rights because you claim to have lived in SLO County longer than some others. But the truth is, that would not give you ANY special rights nor does it excuse you from the bigotry you so publicly display.


Laughlines

What you call bigotry (and that word along with “racism” is overused these days) is just calling it like it is. Lots of people have arrived here, declared their love for the area, and then set about to remake the area in the image of the place they just left. That is wrong, in my opinion. It shows a lack of respect for those who’ve been stakeholders, to use another current buzzword, for a longer period of time. It speaks to a self-absorption that is unseemly. It’s like the people who move in next to a ranch that’s been there for decades, and then start whining about old tractors being visible. The place was there when they moved in!! And, by the way, that is a real story of SLO County. The rancher had to dance to the newcomers’ tune, and I think that’s a shame. I don’t know what you have on your DD214, or if you have one, but if you don’t then you inherited your Constitutional rights, you didn’t earn them. Facts, Jack. And if you read my post, I merely said that I had the same right as everyone else to speak my mind. I claimed no special rights. So, once again, you’re wrong, though I suppose on a gut level you must be used to that by now. As for home values, of course I want a moderate rise in home values, as it benefits me personally. What we’ve had was an unnatural rise in values that was never matched by any commensurate increase in average earning power. Even though I have a house, it does me no good to have over 80% of county residents priced out of the market. Taking away good solid businesses like power plants not only chips away at earning capability for those who might have been employed there, it also helps raise power rates for all the other businesses and residents. I’m not unhappy, but I won’t play the current “everyone gets a trophy” game and not speak my mind. We need fewer antique stores and such, and more businesses that actually produce things and pay people. There you go. You don’t have to like my opinion, and I don’t have to sugarcoat it for you.


slophocles

I just assumed that you understood that I understood that improvement is subjective (the newcomers’ the transplants’ etc) and that I would have to explain that part. Maybe I should have put it in quotes, I don’t know. And I still think you’re taking this personally and I don’t like being told to check myself. I’m 6-foot 9, 385 pounds, and I eat eucalyptus trees for the fiber, since they are no good for lumber.


Laughlines

Here’s the deal. Of course people move back and forth freely, and that’s a good thing. But it seems to me, that if I move to a new area, then politeness and respect dictate that I don’t start demanding right away that everything change just to suit me. The word is respect. It’s something that is misunderstood these days. People who move to a new area should at least put in a bit of time, learn the area, get to know the people, and then engage in dialogue. We haven’t had that here. We get packs of people who form shrill interest groups and start trying to cram their vision down everyone else’s throat. It bugs the crap out of me and I have the same (only the same, mind you, but I’m exercising it) right to speak my mind as anyone else. If being told to check yourself on a rough-and-tumble forum gets to you that bad, then it’s merely confirmation of your need to check yourself. And, lastly, you could be 13′ 6″, 770 pounds and I’m still going to speak my mind as I damn well please. Count on it.


slophocles

Yeah? Well here’s the REAL deal. Let’s say I’m 16-foot-13, pack 1500 lbs, and eat fishing boats just for the fun of it – hull, stern, nets and all. Then what? Maybe the people that move here find some of the “locals” to be impolite, shrill, and disrespectful. And what makes you think you deserve respect for staying in one place so long? One might argue that you deserve LESS respect. And seriously, did you really just call this forum “rough and tumble”?


Laughlines

Let’s see if we can work this out together, OK? In the first place, while I have lived here most of my life, I have spent many years in other cities, states and a considerable amount of time abroad. I never stated that I’ve been here nonstop for 40+ years. To your point about some locals being jerks, of course there are some in every group. I believe we can disagree without being disagreeable. I never said anyone should be impolite to anyone else, irrespective of how long that person’s been residing in the area. However, with that said, I won’t swallow a whole lot of crap, either. I am not inclined to do so by temperament, training and experience. I DID say that a lot of recent residents tend to start trying to share their ideas of how to improve the area, and that that tends to alienate the longer-term residents. As far as the power plant goes, as I said earlier, previous attempts to modernize the plant got shouted down by local interest groups. I believe that the plant could have been and most likely still could be modernized, and that that would be a benefit to the local economy both for those who would work there and for the rest of us who use electricity every day. And every one of us posting here is quite obviously using electricity, wouldn’t you agree? The reasons why the plant is no longer economically viable are primarily political, at both the local and state level. At the local level, in my experience, the loudest shouters against such businesses tend to be more recent arrivals to the area. The state-level idiocy is a topic for another forum entirely.


probiz

Depends on your definition of improve. There is a difference between that and redistribute.


WiserGuy

“Seniority”? Are you serious? This is a DEMOCRACY. “Seniority” should have nothing to do with it. In the United States ALL citizens have equal rights.


It sounds like you were traumatized by your friends mom who tried to lay the same crap on you that you are now trying to lay on others.


If the best tradition you can tout is showing respect to an obsolete power plant, I think you needs some new traditions.


WiserGuy

Morro Bay will survive without a power plant next to the beach.


Laughlines

The stacks have been there as long as I can remember, which in my case goes back over 40 years. This plant can produce 650MW of power. Compare that to the 250MW produced by the new CalVal solar plant. We, as a State and as a society, need electricity. Beginning the process to solar is fine, but logic would indicate that you don’t deactivate 650MW of generation capacity before you have its replacement online. Yes, solar is fine, but let’s look at the facts: hundreds or thousands of acres for a solar plant in a sensitive habitat area versus roughly 15-20 acres (just my guess on the size of the MB plant) in a spot where the plant has been since 1955. Prior to the installation of the plant, lots in Morro Bay sold for next to nothing. It was the coming of the plant and the attendant jobs that helped Morro Bay elevate its economic status. Tourist activity alone will not be enough for Morro Bay to thrive. What will happen is that the transformation of Morro Bay into a boutique town like Carmel or Montecito will be complete, and the average working families that used to live there will be aced out. That’s the real end game here, in my opinion. The Lexus Liberals want to drive out all the “lower” types from their new-found playground. Those who slam the recent transplants for screwing up a good thing are spot on. I’ve seen it all my life. We need brick-and-mortar plants and businesses that can employ regular people, and give them a chance to improve themselves. We do NOT need to create a hoity-toity little fantasy town where only rich retirees can afford to spend $800-$900/square foot for real estate. And I’m not one who begrudges those who’ve been successful, not at all, but for Christ’s sake, remember the folks who are still working their way up and need places to work besides taffy stores and gift shops.


WiserGuy

The power plant doesn’t employ many people (30 to 40 according to the story). Other businesses that could grow in that location could easily employ more people and provide comparable wages. There could be many kinds of businesses there, not just “taffy stores and gift shops.” Why be so limited in thinking?


Your theory that building the plant is the cause of property values rising nearby is suspect. Lots in Shell Beach in the 1950s also sold for “next to nothing.” They are now worth MORE than lots in Morro Bay without having to have a power plant built next door.


Things evolve, life brings changes. We needn’t be slaves to obsolete technology. Get real, please.


Laughlines

The plant used to employ many more people. It operates only intermittently now, and obviously modernization will to some extent reduce the required work force. However, with natural gas as cheap as it’s ever been, and with California still in need of power, I think the idea of just tossing away this plant is foolish. It could be modernized, operated cleanly, and provide good jobs and reliable power for lots of people. Once it’s gone, that’s it. It is impossible to build a new plant these days. Solar and wind are not up to the task. Windmills are eliminating the raptor population, that’s the dirty little secret there. The AP did a good story on that and the fact that wind farms are not prosecuted for raptor kills whereas oil companies are, even though the law should be the same for both. That story came out in May, as I recall, so you can look it up. I support rooftop solar, and if the tax credits come back (my understanding is the credits are no longer available) I’d probably pop for solar on my house. The Carrizo solar plants might well benefit me financially, since I own property out there, but with that said it’s still foolish to think that there’s no negative impact on wildlife. Thank God that the initial plan that would have sucked up all the ground water out there got nowhere. I’m quite adaptable, actually, but the technology of burning a fuel for power is not obsolete yet, not by a long shot. So, thank you for your concern, but I think that I’m quite “real” and I’m waiting for you to join me.


BeenThereDoneThat

Um did you miss the part about what they pay in taxes? I bet more taxes come from that plant per sq foot, than comes from per sq foot on the Embarcadero.


LameCommenter

Good points, plus one addition: Morro Bay can produce 650 MW at midnight, at time of falling natural gas costs. How much can a solar plant warm our homes at midnight? at 5am? When Wheel of Fortune is on TV?


Laughlines

The local gadflies and NIMBYs effectively killed the chance to modernize this plant some years ago. In my opinion this was a terrible mistake. As I said above, people need actual places to work where they might have a hope of bettering themselves and providing for their families. Tourism alone will not be enough. It helps, certainly, but it’s no substitute for having a big plant that can pay people good money and give them a chance to move up in a big company. Morro Bay is never going to attract any significant tech manufacturing due to its geographical separation from the Silicon Valley. Techies are making the money up there to afford a lifestyle that just isn’t available here. I grew up in SLO and I remember Ken’s Schwinn shop, sitting right next to the Honda motorcycle shop, both of them across the street from Uptown Liquor. Now all three places are (or were, the last time I checked) antique stores. That’s how you know when your town is dying. When the people who make things can no longer afford to live there. I finally carved out my little slice in another section of the county, but tens of thousands of young people are being duped into sabotaging their own best interests by supporting “growth caps” and “smart development” and “sustainability”. The older people pushing this feel-good baloney already have theirs, have for years, and in most cases rent apartments and homes to gullible young people at obscene prices. When I was younger I bought into that BS too, until I gained enough years and got mugged by reality enough times to see through their lies. We need to have businesses that can make enough and thus pay enough for young families to be able to buy here. God Bless the older folks, but they are a finite commodity, and soon enough there won’t be anyone left who can cough up $600,000-$1,200,000 for a home.


WiserGuy

Lame, the sun comes up each and EVERY day. It is very consistent. Also, energy generated by solar can be stored in things called BATTERIES.


probiz

I am shocked at support for solar energy. Requires destruction of large areas of the Earth to build it and is financilly not feasable. Our electric rates would be totally unaffordableif dependent on solar the batteries have limited life and are harmful to the environment when disposed of and even wirh massive government subsidies the industry is not financially viable.


WiserGuy

Solar energy DOES NOT require “destruction of large areas of the Earth.” Get real, please. And maybe get a subscription to Home Power magazine and see that all the electricity needed for a home can be generated by solar without ANY destruction of land.


LameCommenter

WiserGuy, I HATE to CLUTTER this valuable interchange with a back and forth, but you are so off the mark on solar and suggesting night batteries. So I ask everyone’s brief indulgence while I inform you:


Number One, I pointed out that solar is useless after dark but the plant makes 650 MW around the clock on cheap, clean methane fuel. Yes, you’re correct, SOLAR plants make no juice CONSISTENTLY during all periods of low sun or darkness. Thank You for making my point.


Number Two, if you think solar energy can be stored in batteries, you are revealing that you know nothing but armchair dreams about battery technology. THERE IS NO battery technology that can store significant (key word) commercial amounts of power, period. Maybe you could champion the fantasy creation of “un-obtainium sulfide” battery technology.


Please put yourself on the NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory email list so you can catch up with the real world.


Dicta: I have lamented this battery problem in previous postings. Battery storage is DECADES away, meantime, I don’t want to get up at 2am for a snack and the toaster doesn’t work because you NIMBY’s and enviros TRASHED the chance to retain and upgrade the Morro Bay plant technology. I have 3 KW solar on a ranch and it takes diesel-electric boat submarine sized batteries to run an air conditioner for an hour or two. So I use the grid, not 5,000 lbs of lead and acid.


WiserGuy

You need to subscribe to Home Power magazine, or go online and read it if you want to be informed about practical household use of solar.


Oh, by the way, plenty of people have homes that use electricity at night that was generated with solar during the daytime.


mb20

No it actually can’t wiserguy. They don’t store any solar used in solar panels it would be too costly. People will solar panels sell there extra electricity to PG&E during the day but rely on PG&E always at night. Its a common misconception that people believe that.


In reality PG&E runs there power plants less during the day and buy your extra solar electricity. And then run more at night.


So people may be paying close to nothing for electricity when they have solar panels but they are still using PG&E services.


WiserGuy

You are ill-informed about practical household use and generation of solar power. Check out Home Power magazine and learn before spouting off ignorant diatribes that mislead people about alternative energy.


mb20

Are you serious? Ha my goodness. There is literally no point in arguing.


slophocles

It’s difficult for some people to accept, but Morro Bay is transitioning from a City of the Past to a City of the Future, and Smukler, Irons, and Johnson (not the elderly one), are the ones leading us there: a car-free, solar-powered, zero-emissions tech-industry town with intelligent, educated people and their families living here.People will move here for the tech careers and ecotourists will flock here on the weekends instead of Valley refugees. The saddest aquarium on earth will be gone, we will have a highly-efficient sewer, and though the fishing industry may not survive, we could build a Commercial Fishing Museum to remember the past by.


slophocles

Oh, and I rescind my previous statements about the smokestacks. I now will be starting a Facebook page called: “Tear Down Those Stacks, Mr. Irons!” I will keep everyone posted.


probiz

The highly efficient sewer plant wont get built an there will never be tech jobs in a town with no development.


slophocles

Just think of it: nothing but pedestrians and electric cars! Our roads will be much easier to upkeep, and they won’t have to be as wide! Everyone will wear those thin rectangular eyeglasses and The Shine Cafe will put the Great American Fish Company out of business and replace it on the new, smokestackless waterfront! I can’t wait!


probiz

I guess you havent done much research on the electric cars and the demand for them. Chevy Volt? Or are you planning to force people to buy things that they don’t wont. Last time I checked GAFCO was doing pretty well. Perhaps Betty can sue George for something and prevail in order to force him out of business. I know she is trying at the Harbor Hut.


givemeabreak2

For what now?! Food poisoning?


Myself

Here let me run a little rain on some of you folks,the tourists don’t begin to put the type of money into this town that that power plant has and never will,the tourists are pretty much a blight on this once working seaport,the power plant has been here longer than all the whiners and complainers that are here now,you people moved to our town if you don’t like it thats too bad,go back where you came from. We have lost Standard oil,Union oil,PG&E,and our fishing industry all because of people that moved here from other places,now just what do you people think is going to happen to this city,Ms.Luker had the foresight to change how the money was delt with in the city’s coffers and the fool for a mayor wants to fire her,I’d just bet the people that whine and complain about our streets are the same ones that don’t want to see the power plant here,I suspose that 10’000 acres of range land turned into glass for solar plants in the Cal valley area is right up your alley isn’t it,out of sight out of mind.

Please just go away before this city does go bankrupt.

I hop that PG&E,or Dygnery or who ever owns this plant leaves it just like it is for 40 years,I’ll fight anything else that the leftys would want put there,thats a tsunami zone.


slophocles

“sewer” grapes?


ironyman2000

Scroo “they were there first.” That is no excuse for anything. It was, is and always will be a

blight until it is razed to the ground.


Myself

Sure they could fit in,but if the majority of the town leans one way and you lean the other way I guess you wouldn’t be a good fit, I know of several people that have retired here from other places and they seemed to have got into the workings of this town,then we have others that don’t want to fit in. Didn’t mean to imply that all that move here are useless.


slophocles

In all those years you never considered building a wall around Morro Bay?


WiserGuy

Since when are YOU the person who decides who “fits in” our community?


With the BIG head you seem to have, it’s a wonder you fit anywhere.


WiserGuy

So, you think a power plant in a “tsunami zone” is a GOOD idea? How so?


BeenThereDoneThat

A another clinger to the tsunami zone boogy man. Yes it can happen, like earthquakes, hurricanes, etc. Do we stop existing because of this and use for an excuse to stop progress or do we find a way to build for it?


probiz

Yeah, but he can post You Tube videos of Japan to make his point. That is the extent of his reasoning.


mb20

Tsunami zone sheeesh. I can’t stand when people talk about Tsunami zones on our coast. If you take a basic Oceanography 100 class in college (I did for my GE requirements) you will learn that Tsunamis occur on an Active Convergent Boundary. We do not have one here. We have a transform fault the San Andreas fault inland.


There are smaller faults located off the coast but none will ever trigger a tsunami like Japan or Sri Lanka experienced. It would be a bizarre anomaly if it did.


WiserGuy

I didn’t bring up tsunamis first. It was the Power Plant guy who said he wouldn’t want to see other businesses replace the power plant because of the threat of tsunamis.He implies it is better to have a power plant in the path of a tsunami rather than other businesses.


In any case, you need to go back to college if you honestly think that any part of the coastline of the Central Coast is immune to tsunamis. Get real, please.


slophocles

But colleges are full of liberal professors.


WiserGuy

There are numerous causes of tsunamis, including deep sea landslides that don’t have anything to do with “Active Convergent Boundaries”.


Even Diablo Canyon documents talk about the potential for tsunamis.


mb20

Oh there can be a tsunami. But Tsunamis are created by huge moved amounts of water creating a shallow water wave. None of the fault lines we have off of the coast will create a large tsunami and 95% of tsunamis are from earthquakes.


Those that don’t occur from earthquakes aren’t big enough to really impact us. The likelihood that we could have a big tsunami in california is MAYBE once in 10,000 years.


WiserGuy

You are simply and absolutely WRONG in what you state about tsunamis. In fact, you are DANGEROUSLY wrong, especially if people in leadership positions would be so foolish enough to believe you.


You claim that your statements reflect what you were taught. So I ask you WHERE and WHEN were you taught such foolish and ill informed notions? Seriously! Because if that is what is still being taught somewhere, we have a serious problem that needs to be addressed ASAP.


mb20

My goodness WiserGuy, that is 100% fact. I learned it at the University of California- Los Angeles.


There can not be a huge tsunami in CA south of SF.

If you look off the coast of Japan and India there are huge trenches and active margins that create tsunamis we don’t have that here.


mb20

Oh also 2010 graduate UCLA*

Forgot the year.


WiserGuy

You are SO DANGEROUSLY wrong as you spread terrible misinformation.


How about you google “can a tsunami hit Southern California?” and learn how much you don’t know and how dangerous you misleading propaganda is.


I’m thinking you may be involved in real estate sales for you to want to purposely mislead people about risk to property and life on the Central Coast.


LameCommenter

Myself, in your posting you’re correct that the tourists are pretty much a blight. The worst of them are the illegal modified exhaust loud bikers. For the purchase of a beer or meal or two, they shake the homes with their “look at me” crap oil dripping machines, with every thuggish mile they ride.


It is against federal* and state** law to make a car or garbage motorcycle one decibel louder, and the factory standard is the same as a Toyota Camry. Cops do little about it since some of them ride thug bikes off duty, and bikers defend their sociopathic thunder by saying “it’s for my safety”, “none of your business”, “it came that way from the factory”, and “I ride once a year for a Children’s charity so I can do what I want”.


I believed some of the biker lies until I checked the laws. Now I say, “ride a factory muffler and enjoy your machine, or keep your sound out of our bedrooms”.


I also endorse the rest of your post of 11/09.


cites * 40 CFR 205(d)(e) **CVC 27150, 27151 PC 415(b)


slophocles

Riding a loud motorcycle around, especially a Harley, is perhaps the most pathetic plea for attention there is As people get wiser and men get less insecure in their own manhood, we will see fewer and fewer of these stupid machines and they will become as extinct as the horse and buggy.


probiz

This is not a outsider vs native issue. I am one of your described outsiders and couldnt disagree more. Like most things, this is about redistribution of wealth and power using an environmental facade to do so.


WiserGuy

As far as I know, no one from Morro Bay forced the closure of the plant. The company that owns it is making that choice based on economic factors that have little to do with Morro Bay in particular.


Most people who use energy in the country do not have to live next to power plants. San Luis Obispo County has two huge ones that happen to be located smack in the middle of the most beautiful stretches of coastline in the United States. How that came to be is an interesting story in itself, to be detailed later.


In any case, it is not unreasonable for residents in this county to tire of having to hold onto the shitty end of the energy baton. It is not unreasonable for residents in SLO County to want to wash their hands of the negative consequences of the power plants at Morro Bay and Diablo Canyon. They may or may not get their way, but you really can’t blame people for wanting to have a cleaner and safer and more scenic place to live if there is a chance of doing so (without having to move hundreds of miles away.)


SLOChildrenAtPlay

It was Morro Bay’s opposition to Duke Energy’s modernization of the plant that led to Duke selling the plant to Dynegy, who is now closing the plant due to it being obsolete.


My brother works for Dynegy in Moss Landing. Dynegy is hoping to sell the plant in the next three years to someone who can upgrade the plant by installing gas turbine engines that will generate power without the need for cooling water. The plant has the connection to the grid in place, a natural gas supply, and the existing stacks can be used for exhaust. Dynegy figures the property will be worth more money when the once-through cooling water ban takes effect in 2015, and California faces it’s next power crisis. Dynegy may also consider installing the gas turbines themselves when the price of power goes sky-high in 2015.


But thanks anyway for your state of denial, and unrealistic utopian dreams of what could happen to the plant “WiserGuy.” The world still needs dreamers, they just shouldn’t be in government.


r0y

Holy smack-down! Talk about taking a needle of reality to someone’s bubble of a dream!


slophocles

In the next few days I will be looking into starting a Facebook page devoted to saving the smokestacks. I am thinking of calling it: “Save The Smokestacks”.


givemeabreak2

i’ll Sign it. I love them things.


probiz

Lot’s of history you are missing. Do a little checking. This is not new and a failure caused in part by our self appointed watchdogs.


slophocles

It’s spelled “tourists” and Morro Bay depends heavily on revenue from tourist dollars. If the smokestacks deter them at all from visiting Morro Bay then we should consider the long-term implications of that.