Keep Cuesta strong, vote yes on Measure L

November 3, 2014

cuestaOPINION By H. HUNTER PERRY

In August of 2014, the Classified Union of Cuesta College, aka CCCUE, ratified our 2014-15 contract and overwhelmingly endorsed Measure L; the $275,000,000 bond measure that will be appearing on the November ballot to upgrade our college facilities and meet the demands of a growing county and the technological revolution occurring in the workforce. In addition, at the September Board of Trustees meeting CCCUE also made a significant contribution of $999 to the Campaign for Measure L.

Although there are multiple bond measures that will appear throughout the county this November, all of which will affect our members in one way or another, CCCUE ardently supports Measure L and believes in its mission – to “keep Cuesta Strong” for future generations. Most importantly, we believe that to provide the kind of education that will benefit our community well into the 21st century, we have to provide facilities and technology that will keep pace with what is happening in the workforce.

It is important to remember that most of the members of our union live in this county. Our children and grandchildren will be raised and hopefully educated in this county.

With the price of a university education spiraling out of control, Cuesta College, and the community college education system remain one of the best values for a college education. The value of a Cuesta College education has increased in the past year with the introduction of the new promise scholarship, now offered to every newly graduating San Luis Obispo County high school student who completes an application, providing them with a fee-free fall and spring semester. This makes a college education even more accessible to our citizens; enhancing the education of our workforce to the betterment of our communities at large.

However, Cuesta College has not had a reliable source of funding for capital projects, and substantial repairs and upgrades to our facilities are needed since the college was originally built in 1964.

Our budget has been cut over the past five years, and it appears that it may take another three to five years for the college to rebound from the fiscal damage that was done during the recession. Unfortunately, even with a successful rebound in enrollment, the ability for Cuesta College to meet the demands of a growing community, with a depleted infrastructure and 50 year old buildings, will remain an ongoing challenge.

Our community and businesses need access to the classrooms, technology and workforce of the future in order for us to compete in the global market that expands further into our community every day. CCCUE is walking precincts, distributing lawn signs, phone banking and making monetary donations in order to move Cuesta College into the future. This is an investment that must be made if we are to keep our county strong and our workforce the best trained.

Please join CCCUE in supporting Measure L. Please vote yes on Measure L. Thank you!

H. Hunter Perry is the president of the Cuesta College Classified Union of Employees.

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Jorge Estrada

Bond = loan = more debt = does not fix the problem = sets a bad example = No vote from me.


citygirl

Let’s see I earn my money and I put some away for up keep on my house, but Cuesta wants me to pay for the school building up keep and I have no children or grandchildren who will use it. I have to pay for k thru 12 and I have no kids, and now you want me to pay for those who want to get higher education?


WHEN DO I GET A SAY IN HOW “I’ SPEND ‘MY’ MONEY.


I am so sick and tired of everyone wanting just a little bit of money for this,that and the other, I have no money left.


Funny as soon as we get out of the recession here come all the hands saying GIMME.


Not going to happen with my vote.


Zuma7

No, not this time around.


SamLouis

The headline is misleading — Cuesta College is anything but “strong” these days. Thank goodness however that Cuesta has retained its accreditation so that it now has a chance at surviving for the long term.


The more I read and think about Cuesta, the more I think it’s a morass of deadwood, waste and personnel infighting mixed with a small number who really want to do the right thing. I think the environment at Cuesta is septic, it’s that environment that nearly killed the school and it’s holding back the school even today.


I remember during Cuesta’s struggle to retain its accreditation that some recommended that Alan Hancock Community College adsorb Cuesta. While this sort of consolidation is not unheard of in today’s community college environment, I couldn’t believe that things were that bad at Cuesta or that such a move could possibly be beneficial. I certainly can today.


Cuesta has retained its accreditation. That’s wonderful, it truly is good news! Now Cuesta needs to demonstrate some financial frugality, it needs to work with the state on how to deal with those using Cuesta as a “feeder” to Cal Poly and then it needs to come back to the voters with a realistic bond amount and not this absurdly high $275M number.


DennySLO

“CCCUE ratified our 2014-15 contract and overwhelmingly endorsed Measure L”

What a shocker! I WILL VOTE NO!…..L- NO


pigsrule

Title should simply read: Keep Cuesta Fat.


It’s amazing how these bureaucrats, such as this government school official, always advocates these long drawn excuses as to why they need more money.


Run more efficiently and then you might show reason for the community to share their tax dollars with you. If you can’t do the job, let someone else do it.


SamLouis

The headline is misleading — Cuesta College is anything but “strong” these days. Thank goodness however that Cuesta retained its accreditation so that it now has a chance at surviving.


The more I read and think about Cuesta, the more I think it’s a morass of deadwood, waste and personnel infighting mixed with a small number who really want to do the right thing. I think the environment at Cuesta is septic, it’s that environment that nearly killed the school and it’s holding back the school even today.


I remember during Cuesta’s struggle to retain its accreditation that some recommended that Alan Hancock Community College adsorb Cuesta. While this sort of consolidation is not unheard of in today’s community college environment, I couldn’t believe that things were that bad at Cuesta or that such a move could possibly be beneficial. I certainly can today.


Cuesta has retained its accreditation. That’s wonderful, it truly is good! Now Cuesta needs to demonstrate some financial frugality, it needs to work with the state on how to deal with those using Cuesta as a “feeder” to Cal Poly and then it needs to come back to the voters with a realistic bond amount and not this absurdly high $275M number.


Mitch C

Why should the property owners of SLO County be the sole source of funds to refurnish a community college whose student body is comprised of students not only from every CA county but many other states and even some foreign countries? Cuesta is not a community college, it is an institute of higher learning that services the.world population. Since Cal Poly is in SLO county, will we next be asked to support a property tax based to fix Poly’s infrastructure. No on L …


Perspicacious

My household has already cast 4 “no” votes. When the state quits subsidizing services and education for illegal immigrants with my tax money, I might consider it. However, I am so sick and tired of these “small raises” in my tax burden adding up to the point of being ridiculous that I now automatically vote NO on EVERY bond or tax increase issue. I don’t care if the bond was to pay for the education of disadvantaged children of disabled veterans, I vote NO. There is plenty of my tax money being stolen from me already, use some of what you already take from me, don’t take more. Learn how to spend it on worthy causes. Spending over 15 billion on education for illegal immigrants and children of same, is no way to get my vote. SLO voters should vote NO on G also. Notice that the people pushing G have money oozing out of every orifice, and they want to squeeze hardworking folks for more?


Mariposa

Thanks Perspicacious — absolutely couldn’t have said it better! Our household cast two “NO” votes. We hope SLO County and SLO City registered voters suddenly acquire a heaping dose of common sense and join us in VOTING NO on any/all measures that would demand more of our money.


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