Burglar caught in Arroyo Grande

May 7, 2015
Stephen Onaga

Stephen Onaga

Arroyo Grande police caught a suspected thief Tuesday morning standing on a neighboring property of a home he allegedly just burglarized.

The victim of the burglary woke up to find Arroyo Grande resident Stephen Onaga in his house, according to the Arroyo Grande Police Department. When confronted, Onaga, 30, fled the house with some of the victim’s property.

Officers responded to the 200 block of Alder Street at 9:33 a.m. Upon arriving at the scene, they found Onaga standing in the yard of a neighboring home near an open door.

Onaga had the stolen property in his possession when officers located him. The officers arrested Onaga and booked him in San Luis Obispo County Jail.

Onaga is charged with burglary and possession of stolen property. His bail is set at $50,000, according to the county jail website.


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6 Comments

  1. achillesheal says:

    Glad it wasn’t my house. He would have been shot and I’d probably be in trouble.

    (3) 3 Total Votes - 3 up - 0 down
  2. abigchocoholic says:

    Here we go again.

    Explanation:–Meth

    Bet me.

    (4) 4 Total Votes - 4 up - 0 down
    • mkaney says:

      1910-late 1920s -> Alcohol made them do it!

      early 1930s -> 1950s: Marijuana made them do it!

      1960 -> 1970: LSD made them do it!

      mid 1970s -> mid 1980;s: PCP made them do it!

      mid 1980s -> 2000: Crack made them do it!

      2000 -> now: Meth made them do it!

      In every case, the people saying it were absolutely certain that their perception was true, often based on “personal experience” with individuals. It’s always nonsense. There is often a correlation between drug use and crime. There is very little causal relationship between any specific drug and crime.

      (-1) 5 Total Votes - 2 up - 3 down
      • mkaney says:

        except maybe alcohol and assault

        (4) 6 Total Votes - 5 up - 1 down
      • markslo70 says:

        except maybe in the sense that black markets force prices sky high, and addicts resort to crime as a means of getting their fix. Industries that benefit financially from prohibition of course like to blame the drugs, not the policy. I’m not saying drugs don’t cause a lot of problems for both users and society, but the means we’ve adopted to deal with these problems amount to little more than a hustle intended to line the pockets of fat cats, politicians, and criminals.

        (-1) 5 Total Votes - 2 up - 3 down
      • abigchocoholic says:

        1910-late 1920s -> Alcohol made them do it!
        ————–
        Wrong. You made this up. Crime went up 10 fold after alcohol became illegal.
        And anyone with common sense and life experience knows how people’s behavior changes when on alcohol. Yes, crime especially violence and DUIs go up dramatically when people are drunk.

        early 1930s -> 1950s: Marijuana made them do it!
        ——————
        Wrong. You made this up. Marijuana doesn’t make people do anything. In fact for most it calms them and makes them less likely to do things.

        1960 -> 1970: LSD made them do it!
        ——————-
        Wrong. You made this up. LSD is not addictive so nobody committed crimes to support a desire to try LSD.

        mid 1970s -> mid 1980;s: PCP made them do it!
        —————–
        Maybe for .001% so essentially wrong. You made this up.

        mid 1980s -> 2000: Crack made them do it!
        ———————
        Very addictive drug. Yes people did commit crimes to pay for their addiction.

        2000 -> now: Meth made them do it!
        ————
        Like crack, a very addictive drug. People not only commit crimes to pay for their addiction, the drug itself brings on hallucinations and bizarre behavior.

        (4) 4 Total Votes - 4 up - 0 down

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