Statue of Liberty is designed after a Muslim woman

December 1, 2015


Those agitated by what Bill O’Reilly of Fox News calls “The Dramatic Muslim Invasion” may find a soothing tonic in the history of the Statue of Liberty. The Statue of Liberty was modeled after a Muslim woman.

Our uniquely American icon beckoning the world’s refugees and immigrants to freedom on our shores was designed as a representation of an Egyptian peasant woman.

As we confront the largest refugee crisis since World War II, which we helped create by invading Iraq and providing battle-field experience to Al Qaeda in Iraq (the parent of ISIS), it may be wise to remind ourselves of the origin of the Statue of Liberty.

The statue, proposed as a gift to Egypt to commemorate the 1869 completion of the Suez Canal, was conceived and designed by two Frenchmen, including Gustave Eiffel the Eiffel Tower creator, as a colossal monument to the industrial achievement. After Egypt rejected the plan, the gift was offered to America as “Liberty Enlightening the World.”

Erected in 1886, it stands as a beacon for a nation founded on principles transcending national origin, racial identity and religious affiliation.

Check out The Smithsonian, “The Statue of Liberty Was Originally a Muslim Woman.”

David Broadwater is a long time Atascadero resident and local activist.



  1. Robert1 says:

    Dim view: Historians question new claim Lady Liberty muse was Muslim.

    (2) 2 Total Votes - 2 up - 0 down
  2. Jorge Estrada says:

    Profiling at it’s worst, are we trying to cut Federal expenses?

    (1) 7 Total Votes - 4 up - 3 down
  3. SLOBodan says:

    “Columbia” as was being presented to Egypt was designed in the 1860’s in a time in Egypt’s history where the country was more secular than in todays light. The “peasants” both men and women practiced the ancient polytheistic religions throughout the country side along with Coptic Christians, followers of the Baha’i faith, Jews and followers of Islam both Shiite and Sunni.
    The designers of the statue were targeting the existing dress standard for all women within Egyptian society in the 1860’s. To state a generic Egyptian Peasant women is Muslim is to completely negate the balance of the populace in place within the relevant time of the design.

    (22) 26 Total Votes - 24 up - 2 down
  4. achillesheal says:

    Past immigrants such as my grandparents came to America to work, learn the language, and be Americans. They were most proud of the day they became citizens, for which they had to work very hard.

    People are brought here or come here today to sponge off the system, vote democrat, and in cases like one of the Paris jihadists, potentially kill us. It is a strategy of Isis to take advantage of the stupidity of our political leaders who are more interested than creating a permanent underclass dependants on govt than what is good for the country.

    Please invite some Syrian refugees to live at your home. Let us know how that works out.

    (12) 26 Total Votes - 19 up - 7 down
  5. shelworth says:

    And yet from the National Park Service website;
    The statue’s design almost certainly evolved from an earlier concept Bartholdi proposed for a colossal monument in Egypt, for which the artist used his drawings of Egyptian women as models. Bartholdi’s preliminary design for the Statue of Liberty is consistent with contemporary depictions of Liberty, but differs markedly from sculptures representing freed American slaves and Civil War soldiers. Bartholdi changed a broken shackle and chain in the statue’s left hand to tablets inscribed “July IV, MDCCLXXVI” (July 4, 1776) at Laboulaye’s request, to emphasize a broader vision of liberty for all mankind. There is no evidence that Bartholdi’s “original” design was perceived by white American supporters or the United States government as representing a black woman, or was changed on those grounds.
    An Inquiry into the History and Meaning of Bartholdi’s Liberté éclairant le Monde



    Rebecca M. Joseph, Ph.D.

    with Brooke Rosenblatt and Carolyn Kinebrew

    September 2000

    Northeast Ethnography Program, Boston Support Office, National Park Service

    (5) 7 Total Votes - 6 up - 1 down

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