FBI agents arrest San Luis Obispo Police officer

February 5, 2013

cuffsFBI agents arrested a San Luis Obispo Police officer earlier today following an approximately two-week sting into allegations of police misconduct, sources said.

Officer Cory Pierce allegedly took drugs from criminals and the evidence locker in order to resell. He then, according to inside sources, intimidated a probationer to sell the drugs for him on the street with claims he could make the probationer’s life difficult if he refused.

Pierce also told the probationer that he could work off a heroin charge if he cooperated, the federal attorney’s office in Los Angeles said in a press release. Pierce would provide the probationer and his girlfriend placebo pain pills to trade for real pain pills or drugs used for heroin addiction.

After the probationer told Pierce the drug dealer he had deceived wanted revenge, Pierce said he would “take care of it,” the press release says. Pierce also allegedly took drugs from drug dealers.

“Pierce pulled over the dealer’s vehicle at gunpoint, seized morphine pills and let the dealer go without making an arrest,” the press release says.

After several months of the alleged sale of evidence, the probationer’s girlfriend, who is being held in the San Luis Obispo County Jail, informed guards of the alleged police misconduct which resulted in federal authorities being brought in.

Pierce worked on the San Luis Obispo County Narcotics Task Force at the sheriff’s office.

 


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There’s one more cop I know of that’s in on the drug thing….Eric Lincoln!


grc

Cops are just legal crooks. Don’t trust your government


The Gimlet Eye

All too true in all too many cases. It’s a sad commentary on this area, country, state, country, you name it.


People are just going to have to accept the fact that they are living in a police state.


MikeB

It is interesting to watch some of the dynamics involving this fiasco which involves both the SLOPD and the SLOSO.


This is yet another painful episode of failed leadership which impacts our community tremendously and erodes the moral of the many decent police officers that are out there.


Unfortunately the decent ones are often pressured by managers whose own ethics are at best, questionable. I point to the escapades of the former Chief of Paso Robles as a glaring example.


The Tribune article on this drug incident quoted Sheriff Parkinson as stating, “I am angry and deeply disturbed that this has happened”


Three years ago when Parkinson was running for Sheriff I raised an issue concerning his integrity. It dealt with an issue of cheating on a promotional test and it was reported by several of our news outlets.


Then came revelations that he hadn’t paid taxes, which he blamed on his wife.


Then came a revelation that he had done PI work and testified for a family member, which most private investigators will agree, constituted a conflict of interest.


Then there was the issue of phony political mailers, which he blamed on his political consultant.


Are you beginning to see a pattern here?


Despite the warnings, our community elected Parkinson only to endure additional controversies and law suits concerning the medical marijuana matters and a sex scandal at the Sheriff’s Office.


How much more does our community have to endure? Maybe we should voice Parkinson’s words in unison … We are angry and deeply disturbed too.


BeenThereDoneThat

Quite a few are disturbed by this story as I but I’m even getting more disturbed by ALL the goings on at every level of Gov. in this county in recent years, from county to many local cities.


Maybe we need to get a local F.B.I. office. I’m sure we can keep a staff busy for awhile with all the bullshit.


r0y

Yes, because the FBI and federal government are NEVER corrupt like these local yocals, huh?


BeenThereDoneThat

Roy, there is obviously corruption everywhere from Gov. to private industry. Thank you for stating the obvious.


So by your thinking because it is also there (F.B.I.), we should do nothing? Roy where do you suggest we start then?


OnTheOtherHand

I think that a citizen review committee for allegations against law enforcement personnel and prosecutors — with minimal participation by the DA and/or police officials — should be created with county-wide jurisdiction. A Grand Jury has the appropriate powers but is too limited by the “guidance” of the DA to get to the root of some matters in a county ruled by a GOB Club. I also think that, the FBI might be somewhat less subject to the forces that corrupt local officials as would the CHP and the state AG’s office.


BeenThereDoneThat

Amen. Others and myself here over the years have advocated a police commision like some bigger cities.


The Gimlet Eye

Yep, you have reason to be disturbed. This IS NOT just a “local” anomaly by any means!


But don’t count on the FBI (aka, the Gestapo) to clean things up. Their history is as dark, sinister, menacing, and disgraceful as any nearly any “policiing” organization in history.


Probably the only reason that the FBI even got involved is because something went wrong with this guy’s gig, he did something stupid and blew his cover, or he messed with the wrong party. In any case, he forced their hand. In a situation like this, they move in and “sacrifice” the chump by making a “patsy” out of him (remember Lee Oswald?), and then do their best to cover up the rest of the mess so that the story “stops” right there.


It is only the fact that the US got off to a pretty good start with a Constitution which provided (in theory) checks and balances, etc., that the FBI has not morphed into a full fledged, equally murderous, version of the KGB or Gestapo.


Absent those conditions, the FBI would have engaged in full-scale predatory police state tactics with all the terror and intimidation which that implies.


Even in our system, they have mangaged to give those other murderous police organs a good run for their money in any ways that they could get away with without arousing the anger of the people.


Anyone who doubts this needs to read:


J. Edgar Hoover: The Man and the Secrets, by Curt Gentry. This is a great, if frightening, book!


http://www.amazon.com/J-Edgar-Hoover-Man-Secrets/dp/0393321282/


Gordo

This is a deeply disturbing story. My question is what was this guy’s sergeant and lieutenant doing out at the sheriff’s narcotics division? Usually when these things happen it is because of inadequate supervision and poor management. I wonder if any heads will role at the police or sheriff’s departments.


The Gimlet Eye

Probably the same thing that he was doing.


But when things go wrong, you have to have a “patsy” to facilitate the “clean up”!


How dare you ask such questions, citizen! The police state doesn’t take kindly to this kind of talk!


Pelican1

Why did not the FBI get involved with the alleged Mason beating investigation? Or the drunk CHP escapade? Or the questionable Sheriffs’ dept. issues? Were they involved in the Chitty,Chitty Bang Bang scandal?

Hmm….I’m curious as to what criteria triggers involvement.


r0y

Drugs. The feds do not like competition.


The Gimlet Eye

Told you the police were in on the drug thing. It’s been going on for a long, long time.


MaryMalone

Give me a break. The FBI can come to SLO to arrest a drug-dealing cop, yet John Wallace has been fleecing government agencies in SLO County for DECADES, and has committed fraud at the SSLOCSD, and the FBI can’t even bother to pick him up on their way out of town?


I think the priorities of our Federal Government are WAY out of wack.


OnTheOtherHand

Wallace’s scams are not really in their jurisdiction. The state should be able to step in however. The lack of interest on their part might be partially that they have bigger issues or it could be political influence. I really don’t know which or how much.


The Gimlet Eye

The “bigger issues” could be that they are involved in many of the same things, just on a BIGGER scale.


That would explain their “lack of interest” very nicely.


How high does the drug thing go? Take a guess.


MaryMalone

I’m surprised Officer Cory wasn’t named Employee of the Year. He certainly has the qualifications for being SLO’s Employee of the year.


mkaney

Keep in mind that this is actually at the level of a violent crime. With this position and the fact that he is armed, he is making people do what he wants with the threat of force.


danika

What about making officers do what you want with the threat of job loss and/or other reprocussions if you don’t uphold illegal quotas or get horizontal with the Police Chief?