Gov. Newsom signs bill allowing college athletes to be paid

October 1, 2019

Gov. Gavin Newsom

By JOSH FRIEDMAN

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into a law on Monday a bill that will allow college athletes to receive compensation for the use of their name, image and likeness.

The signing of SB 206 makes California the first state in the country to allow student athletes to make money from their athletic endeavors. Under the new law, college athletes will be allowed to sign endorsement deals and hire state-licensed agents.

Currently, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rules prohibit student athletes from receiving endorsement deals or payments for the use of their images. The new state regulations, which threaten to upend the current NCAA model, apply to four-year institutions but not to community colleges.

Newsom signed the bill into law on an HBO show hosted by NBA star LeBron James.

“I don’t want to say this is checkmate, but this is a major problem for the NCAA,” Newsom said on the show. “It’s going to initiate dozens of other states to introduce similar legislation.”

Newsom argued the new law puts the interests of athletes on par with the interests of institutions.

“Colleges reap billions from student athletes but block them from earning a single dollar. That’s a bankrupt model,” Newsom stated in a tweet.

In response to Newsom signing the bill into law, the NCAA released a statement criticizing the legislation but saying changes are needed.

“Unfortunately, this new law already is creating confusion for current and future student athletes, coaches, administrators and campuses, and not just in California,” the NCAA said in the statement. “As more states consider their own specific legislation related to this topic, it is clear that a patchwork of different laws from different states will make unattainable the goal of providing a fair and level playing field for 1,100 campuses and nearly half a million student athletes nationwide.”

A legal challenge of SB 206 is widely expected. The law is set to take effect in 2023.


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Jorge Estrada

Will they accrue time towards a pension, health benefits and pay income taxes too? If they decide to remain in this career, every bone jarring moment should be counted.


giblets56

Lets take Newsome’s salary and pay the athletes!! Then maybe we can get a REAL governor that cares about the state of California!? What happened to his recall? he needs to GO!


Lmo

So, will this effectively disqualify California schools from competing in NCAA events? My nephew in law is an NCAA attorney.


kwake

Of course California wants them to get paid..now California gets a new untouched revanue stream!!!!


Rambunctious

Just an I want to be president someday show bill…


citizensoldier

To Newson’s credit he did stop the high speed budget busting rail to nowhere:


https://www.providencejournal.com/opinion/20190302/my-turn-victor-davis-hanson-californias-rendezvous-with-reality

The inability to build reservoirs is especially tragic given that the state’s high-speed-rail project has gobbled up more than $5 billion in funds without a single foot of track laid.


For me…

It was about the inability to provide low elevation water containment…


kayaknut

Why stop here, go the way of race cars, sponsor emblems on the jerseys so we all know what companies are buying which athletes.


jimmy_me

Great idea! Let’s do the same for politicians.


copperhead

This may be the first issue that I am in full agreement with our governor. Beware athletes, California will want their fair share of your new found revenue, assuming it ever comes to pass. That train is never late!


Unfortunately, No revenue will be received by collegiate athletes until the NCAA allows it, regardless of California’s law.