San Luis Obispo supervisors in favor of a new women’s jail

February 23, 2011

The San Luis Obispo County Supervisors voted unanimously on Tuesday to move forward on plans to construct a new women’s jail.

The current jail is overcrowded with at times more than 70 inmates packed into a space built for 43 women. The proposed jail would hold 196 women and include a yard, room for vocational training programs and a male and female inmate medical facility.

County supervisors voted to move ahead on procuring a $25 million grant the state has already awarded the project.The new jail complex is estimated to cost $35 million. The new jail will cost the county approximately $10 million.

County officials will now begin contract negotiations with the state.


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9 Comments

  1. SLOBIRD says:

    Honest question for someone who might know: How long does an average women still in the “COUNTY” jail.

    Thanks!

    (0) 0 Total Votes - 0 up - 0 down
  2. shorty says:

    The state on the one hand is tried to sell buildings to raise cash. On the other hand in the midst of a real estate glut they’re on a rampage of new construction that —increases— expenses and further ruins our credit. Schools, courts, jails, agencies are all doing it.
    There’s jail and courthouse projects statewide (see AOC office of Construction and Management site). Michael Paul at the AOC got fired for pointing out the state somehow is spending 2x what the Feds spend to build courthouses(report on KGO San Fran). Rehab of existing building can create the space you need at 1/8 the cost of new, and 1/6 the time.
    The RDA in Stockton, foreclosure capital/real estate glut central, is building new houses. Jerry was right – the Redevelopment agencies should be shut down to fund the schools.
    See Sacbee article about “Inland Regional Center” by Jack Chang. A 70 million bond issue used for a … no-bid… contract that 2-3xd the agencies space costs.

    We’re being ripped off…………………………..
    dixi
    /shorty

    (5) 5 Total Votes - 5 up - 0 down
  3. CA Native says:

    And I’m in favor of me having a new truck, too. But, like the county, I don’t have the money.

    (4) 8 Total Votes - 6 up - 2 down
  4. easymoney says:

    Excuse me, but if criminals did not break the laws no one would be arrested in the first place. And to go after LEO for the behavior by those who can not tell right from wrong is laughable…

    (5) 13 Total Votes - 9 up - 4 down
    • Bert says:

      It’s not that easy, easymoney. For example when you put people in jail for non-violent drug offenses, and you do not treat the issue as it really is, a health issue, then you get jail/prison overcrowding. We need to build schools, not jails. The more educated one is, the less likely to get hooked on drugs or commit a crime. In our country, an African-American male is more likely to go to jail than college.

      (3) 7 Total Votes - 5 up - 2 down
      • easymoney says:

        Actually it is really that easy…
        If you break the law you “should” be in jail, paying your debt to society. If you don’t like the law change it, but until then we have a set of rules on how to deal with those who commit crimes.
        Yes, there is a problem with the way many judgments are handed down and enforced, but until we have something better, get used to more jails.
        The fine line between smoking one doobie vs selling meth or heroin to kids, is only in the eyes of the judge and jury. Just like the difference between someone stealing a comic book or some candy vs stealing someones life savings. They are all crimes but some deserve a more harsh sentance than others.
        Yes, there are some poeple who have mental issues or have fallen on hard times, but that does not excuse them from being able to tell right from wrong…

        (0) 10 Total Votes - 5 up - 5 down
        • justme says:

          …people… have fallen on hard times… Those people have chosen commision of crimes to be the “right” choice over maybe sleeping outside hungry on a particular night. Probably a temporarily bad decision.Then off to the joint? t’s a self perpetuating fulfillment.
          Get ’em off the street, detoxed, fed & working.
          Personally I think the crime & punishment industry, which is becoming privatized, needs “guilty” decisions made at a rate that keep profits rising. How did that become OK? THAT is a crime.

          (2) 2 Total Votes - 2 up - 0 down
      • easymoney says:

        bert, I have a question, where does the line get drawn?
        Stealing two sticks of gum or one?
        Smoking a joint from marijuana you grow yourself or growing tens of thosands of plants for sale on the black market?
        I agree the laws need changing to be more logical and fair, as well as felonies should have mandatory sentences that can’t be plea bargained or bought off. You kill someone you give up your life, period.
        I agree smoking a joint should not amount to any jail time at all.
        I agree that law abiding citizens should be allowed to own firearms but criminals should not. And if a criminal commits a crime with a weapon, any weapon, then they too give up their life.
        Seems we drove off the tracks years ago and now there are too many laws which are too confusing or rediculous not to mention any law can be thrown out by the supreme court or ninth circus.

        (-3) 3 Total Votes - 0 up - 3 down
  5. danika says:

    If citizens weren’t arrested because of demonstration of control exterted from the local LEOs, there would be no overcrowding. Curtail the power trips, officers. No more MMJ dispensary arrests, Matt Hart type arrests, unfair DUI checkpoint arrests simply because YOU can. Those that truly warrant arrest, by all means do so. After all, our safety is paramount but not an excuse for abuse of power. Get it?

    (3) 21 Total Votes - 12 up - 9 down

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