Robber delivers blow at SLO post office, then steals mail

July 11, 2017

Christopher Andrew Caples

A 45-year-old man attacked a person retrieving mail at a downtown San Luis Obispo post office on Monday and ran off with some stolen items. But, witnesses tracked the suspect and officers arrested him promptly.

Around 6:18 p.m., Christopher Andrew Caples, whom police describe as a San Luis Obispo transient, approached a person at a post office box at 893 Marsh Street and demanded the victim’s wallet.

After the victim refused, Caples knocked the victim to the ground and rummaged through the open mailbox. He then fled the scene on foot with some of the victim’s mail.

A witness to the robbery followed Caples out of the post office and recovered some of the stolen mail, which was returned to the victim. Another witness followed Caples and directed officers to his location.

Officers detained Caples nearby on Morro Street. Police arrested him for robbery and booked him into the San Luis Obispo County Jail.

Caples remains in custody with his bail set at $30,000. The victim suffered injuries but declined medical attention at the scene.

San Luis Obispo police thank the community members who aided the victim and followed Caples at a safe distance until officers arrived.


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c.d.cox

Turn him over to the Feds this strong armed robbery took place on Federal property so therefore federal trial federal time. The locals are remiss if they fail to do this. Any one that robs a grog shop and takes an alcohol has committed a federal crime to wit failure to pay federal taxes on alcohol .


c.d.cox

The SLO Police Farce new motto is not To Serve And Protect it is We Cruise An Abuse.


Rambunctious

“Police arrested him for robbery and booked him into the San Luis Obispo County Jail.”


Get it right SLO PD that is called strong arm robbery…


c.d.cox

The way the other cities handle the homeless (Bums)is to give them a one way ticket to SLO. You bleeding hearts that give them money are only aiding-abeting their drug-alchol addiction. Anyone that gives the money should get a ticket.


circlingthedrain

The Happiest Place in the US doesn’t have the ability of foresight, or even critical thinking and deductive reasoning. The freeways are becoming more congested, but they keep building both hotels and properties (failing to project and plan). The crime rate continues to skyrocket, but they cannot add 2 & 2 together. (I personally warned the police about a group of pickpockets and provided them with a timeframe of surveillance footage at a local bank where the pickpockets were assembling upon arrival in town (could have been viewed to ID a major ring) but the police blew it off. They later found 18 wallets discarded in a dumpster locally–they just couldn’t figure it out….they literally never tied it together. The police don’t have familiarity with citizens anymore because the population changes and shifts with our high transient population (transient meaning the high homeless population AND the constantly rotating college population, plus the ever changing tourist populace). How do you properly police a population that is constantly shifting? “I don’t know Earl, where they heck do ya think all these here wallets came from?” “Dur….do ya think we might need some of that there plexiglass they have at the county jail and HASLO down there at the post office…[scratching head]…”?


saywhat

I share your frustration but I have been observing this carefully for some time.

The cops aren’t dumb. They purposely don’t arrest the criminals (unless they absolutely have to) because then they have to report the crimes and that “looks bad.”

It typically takes an officer 20 minutes to arrive at the scene and by then the criminal is gone.

There is no more “serve and protect.” The greed and corruption in that department make me physically ill.


Slosum

20 years ago, there were only four or five truly needy street people in downtown Slo…. we knew their names and they were taken care of. What the hell has happened since? Anyone?


non_sequitur

I explored the sidewalks of SLO in detail as a teenager 30 years ago, and I can can say with certainty that your assertation of “only four or five truly needy street people” 20 years ago is a far-fetched exaggeration. This is not a new problem, nor is it unique to SLO.


griffleroy

Wait what? This is the HAPPIEST PLACE ON EARTH! How could this happen here? I thought Mr. Hills wife was in charge of taking care of this issue?


shelworth

Maybe he did it with a smile on his face?


slomark

When are we going to fix the transient problem here in SLO? Other “compassionate” cities seem to have found ways to keep the troublemakers and bums off the sidewalks and away from others. Just letting them roam around, laying on our streets, is not a solution.


SLOBIRD

As soon as the new Homeless Center is built and the all the new arrivals come to SLO! The can entertain each other (or teach them the tricks of the trade…).


RonHolt

The new center won’t even house all the existing homeless that qualify (i.e. drug and alcohol free) right now. I don’t think it will draw more from the outside.


TWEEKSBALMER

We either elect them or give them government jobs.


non_sequitur

Check Santa Cruz. Thier “hands-off” policy on homeless, where transients are just allowed to roam around, laying on the street, etc. has both negative and positve consequences. Not saying it’s better or worse than what SLO does, but it must be a lot cheaper.


kayaknut

No homeless problem in SLO, or so the SLOPD chief keeps telling us. All we need to do is use more taxpayer money to fix this non-existent problem.


SLOBIRD

You live in a Socialist City, the homeless, illegals, criminals and all other misfits are welcome. You know, I keep looking around for the approximately 4,000 homeless in this County, yes, there are plenty but 4,000?), but I am told by an official the high count matters because there is generous government funding that comes to the County and Cities based on the the homeless count. The new SLO Venezuelan Government… we feed, clothe, house, teach and will take good care of you!


granola_girl

The 2015 federally required, biennial enumeration/point-in-time count found approximately 1,500 homeless individuals. The 2017 numbers haven’t been published yet. Where did you get your 4,000 number? Even though the general consensus among providers is that the 1,500 number is a tad low, I’ve never heard anyone toss out an estimate of 4,000.